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Special University Supplement • Cause Magazine Outstanding Schools, Colleges and Universities Southern Methodist University


to interact closely with faculty members. More than 60 percent of all undergraduate lecture sections have fewer than 25 students. More than 80 percent of the full-time faculty members hold a Ph.D. or the highest degree in their fields.


SMU offers 32 study abroad programs in 24 countries for yearlong, semester or summer study, as well as at our campus in Taos, New Mexico. Learning at SMU includes opportunities for mentoring relationships, internships, leadership development, research experience, international study and community service. SMU’s 10 libraries house the largest private collection of research materials in the Southwest.


The Education of Your Life For the education of your life, discover SMU in Dallas, a small, caring academic community in the heart of a vibrant city. Founded in 1911 by what is now the United Methodist Church, SMU opened in 1915 with support from Dallas business and community leaders. The University is nonsectarian in its teach- ing and is committed to freedom of inquiry. At SMU, you’ll encounter academic advisers to help you discover your true inter- ests and talents, enthusiastic professors to answer questions about challenging assignments and professional career counselors to help you seek internships during college and jobs after graduation. At SMU, excellence is the standard and the goal is to help students succeed. Dallas-Fort Worth is now the fourth-largest metro area in the country. Fortune magazine ranked the Dallas area second after New York City in the concentration of corpo- rate headquarters and fifth in Fortune 500 corporate headquar- ters, and Texas is home to the most Fortune 500 corporate head- quarters. Forbes magazine ranked Dallas as number five on its list of the 10 best big cities to find a job. In fact, all of the top five cities are in Texas.


SMU offers nearly 80 majors in business, engineering, com- munications, the arts, humanities and sciences. SMU welcomes students of every religion, race, color, ethnic origin and econom- ic status. Students come from all 50 states and from 97 countries. Total enrollment is 10,965, including 6,240 undergraduates. The undergraduate student-faculty ratio is 12:1, allowing students


SMU’s Cox School of Business is recognized as a leader in business education by such publications as BusinessWeek, Forbes, The Economist, Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal and U.S. News & World Report. The Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering features some of the most advanced and environmentally friendly academic build- ings in the country. The Embrey Engineering Building has earned the coveted Leadership in Engineering and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council – the only academic building in Texas to qualify – and uses energy-efficient technology, water reclamation and local and recycled materials. The new Caruth Hall, now under construction, also is being built to LEED Gold standards.


If you’re into the thrill of the game, SMU competes in 17 NCAA Division I sports and has ranked number one in its con- ference for 10 of the past 11 years in the Director’s Cup Division I All-Sports Standings. SMU also offers 30 intramural or club sports for those who like to compete rather than watch.


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