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Cause Magazine


editors, directors and many others con- tributing to the finished product. Some of these professionals specialize only in news related jobs. In addition, there are a wide variety of other occupations available in the broadcast industry. Some are more technically oriented such as radio, television and camera operators, broadcast engineers, technicians and administrators. Also sales, advertis- ing, promotions, and marketing occupations are another area within the field. And as with any other organization there are always a wide range of adminis- trative, executive and support staff posi- tions.


Competition is keen for most of these jobs, particularly in large metropolitan areas, because of the large number of job- seekers attracted by the glamour of this industry. Job prospects are best for appli- cants with a college degree in broadcast- ing or a related field, and relevant experi- ence, such as work at college radio and television stations or internships at profes- sional stations. In this highly competitive industry, broadcasters are not always will- ing to provide on-the-job training, and instead seek candidates who can perform


the job immediately. Many entry-level positions are at smaller broadcast sta- tions; consequently, workers often must change employers, and sometimes relo- cate, in order to advance.


The following is a brief description of the many jobs available in broadcasting: Employees in PROGRAM PRO- DUCTION OCCUPATIONS at tele- vision and radio stations create programs such as news, talk, and music shows. Jobs in this area include:


Assistant producers provide cler- ical support and background research; assist with the preparation of musical, written, and visual materials; and time productions to make sure that they do not run over schedule. Assistant producers also may operate cameras and other audio and video equipment. Video editors select and assemble pre-taped video to create a finished pro- gram, applying sound and special effects as necessary. Conventional editing requires assembling pieces of videotape in a linear fashion to create a finished prod- uct. The editor first assembles the begin- ning of the program, and then, works sequentially towards the end. Newer com-


puterized editing allows an editor to elec- tronically cut and paste video segments. This electronic technique is known as nonlinear editing because the editor is no longer restricted to working sequentially; a segment may be moved at any time to any location in the program. Producers plan and develop live or taped productions, determining how the show will look and sound. They select the script, talent, sets, props, lighting, and other production elements. Producers also coordinate the activities of on-air per- sonalities, production staff, and other per- sonnel. Web site or Internet producers, a relatively new occupation in the broad- casting industry, plan and develop Internet sites that provide news updates, program schedules, and information about popular shows. These producers decide what will appear on the Internet sites, and design and maintain them. Announcers read news items and provide other information, such as pro- gram schedules and station breaks for


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