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Cause Magazine


variety of cultures which inspire her. “New York City is my uni- versity, design magazines are my homework and HGTV is my lecture hall,” she says.


Her first big design moment came when she was 12 years old. An uncle gave her stacks of Architectural Digest magazines. One of them focused on New York penthouses.


Shocked that


people could live in such a beautiful way, she was hooked. Ever since then, she has developed her eye and her taste and has con- centrated her interest on her three favorite styles which are Modern, Boho (bohemian chic), and Contemporary. As a result, Kim was already a talented amateur who knew how to accessorize a room, but the high pressure challenges on “Design Star” were a crash course in the nuts and bolts of inte- rior design. Talk about on the job training! One challenge towards the end of the season had her and a rival designer work- ing together on a kitchen renovation for singing legend Wayne Newton and his wife. The outcome was not as successful as she had hoped, but considering the ridiculous time constraints of the show and the unpleasant working relationship she endured with her co-designer it was pretty good. At least it was good enough to stay in the game.


She always shows a knack for making spaces come alive in a stylish and tasteful way for very little cost and she is not afraid to take a risk. She has made elegant chandeliers out of gold paper clips, temporary wall cover- ings out of fabric, and ‘bam- boo’ shades out of inexpensive slats of wood. Her website even features a DIY project for a cute mod lamp made out of plastic drinking cups. As she has said, “I grew up poor and moved to New York City as an actress. Both of those experiences make you good with a nickel!”


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