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Cause Magazine


commercials or public service informa- tion. Many radio announcers are referred to as disc jockeys; they play recorded music on radio stations. Disc jockeys may take requests from listeners; interview guests; and comment on the music, weather, or traffic. Most stations now have placed all of their advertisements, sound bites, and music on a computer, which is used to select and play or edit the items. Technological advances have sim- plified the monitoring and adjusting of the transmitter, leaving disc jockeys responsible for most of the tasks associat- ed with keeping a station on the air. Traditional tapes and CDs are used only as backups in case of a computer failure. Announcers and disc jockeys need a good speaking voice; the latter also need a sig- nificant knowledge of music. Program directors are in charge of on-air programming in radio stations. Program directors decide what type of music will be played, supervise on-air personnel, and often select the specific songs and the order in which they will be played. Considerable experience, usually as a disc jockey, is required, as well as a thorough knowledge of music.


NEWS-RELATED OCCUPATIONS News, weather, and sports reports are important to many television stations because these reports attract a large audi- ence and account for a large proportion of revenue. Many radio stations depend on up-to-the-minute news for a major share of their programming. Program produc- tion staff such as producers and announc- ers, also work on the production of news programs.


Reporters gather information from various sources, analyze and prepare news stories, and present information on the air. Correspondents report on news occurring in U.S. and foreign cities in which they are stationed. News writers write and edit news stories from informa- tion collected by reporters. News writers may advance to positions as reporters or correspondents.


TECHNICAL OCCUPATIONS Employees in these occupations operate and maintain the electronic equipment that records and transmits radio or television programs. The titles of some of these occupations use the terms “engineer,” “technician,” and “operator” interchangeably.


Broadcast news analysts, also known as news anchors, analyze, inter- pret, and broadcast news received from various sources. News anchors present news stories and introduce videotaped news or live transmissions from on-the- scene reporters. Newscasters at large sta- tions may specialize in a particular field. Weathercasters, also called weather reporters, report current and forecasted weather conditions. They gather informa- tion from national satellite weather servic- es, wire services, and local and regional weather bureaus. Some weathercasters are trained atmospheric scientists and can develop their own weather forecasts. Sportscasters, who are responsible for reporting sporting events, usually select, write, and deliver the sports news for each newscast.


Assistant news directors super- vise the newsroom; they coordinate wire service reports, tape or film inserts, and stories from individual news writers and reporters. Assignment editors assign stories to news teams, sending the teams on location if necessary. News directors have overall responsi- bility for the news team made up of reporters, writers, editors, and newscast- ers as well as studio and mobile unit pro- duction crews. This senior administrative position entails responsibilities that include determining what events to cover, and how and when they will be presented in a news broadcast.


Radio operators manage equip- ment that regulates the signal strength, clarity, and range of sounds and colors of broadcasts. They also monitor and log outgoing signals and operate transmitters. Audio and video equipment techni- cians operate equipment to regulate the volume, sound quality, brightness, con- trast, and visual quality of a broadcast. Broadcast technicians set up and maintain electronic broadcasting equip- ment. Their work can extend outside the studio, as when they set up portable trans- mitting equipment or maintain stationary towers.


Television and video camera


operators set up and operate studio cameras, which are used in the television studio, and electronic news gathering cameras, which are mobile and used out- side the studio when a news team is pur- suing a story at another location. Camera operators need training in video produc- tion as well as some experience in televi- sion production. Camera operators work- ing on mobile news teams must have the physical stamina to carry and set up their equipment.


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