This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Cause Magazine


Technological changes have enabled some camera operators also to fulfill the tasks of broadcast technicians, operating the transmission and editing equipment on a remote broadcasting truck. Master control engineers ensure that all of the radio or television station’s


SALES, PROMOTIONS AND MARKETING OCCUPATIONS Most workers in this category are advertising sales agents, sometimes known as account executives. They sell advertising time to sponsors, advertis- ing agencies, and other buyers. Sales rep-


supervisors, who may handle a few large accounts personally, supervise these workers. In small stations, part-time sales personnel or announcers often handle sales responsibilities during hours when they are not on the air.


GENERAL ADMINISTRATION General managers or station


scheduled program elements, such as on- location feeds, prerecorded segments, and commercials, are smoothly transmitted. They also are responsible for ensuring that transmissions meet FCC requirements. Technical directors direct the stu- dio and control room technical staff dur- ing the production of a program. They need a thorough understanding of both the production and technical aspects of broadcasting; this knowledge often is acquired by working as a lighting director or camera operator, or as another type of broadcast worker.


Network and computer sys- tems administrators and network systems and data communications analysts design, set up, and maintain systems of computer servers. These servers store recorded programs, adver- tisements, and news clips. Assistant chief engineers oversee the day-to-day technical operations of the station. Chief engineers or directors of engineering are responsible for all of the station’s technical facilities and servic- es. These workers need a bachelors degree in electrical engineering, technical training in broadcast engineering, and years of broadcast engineering experience.


resentatives must have a thorough knowl- edge of the size and characteristics of their network’s or station’s audience, including income levels, gender, age, and consump- tion patterns.


Sales work has expanded beyond the traditional role of simply selling advertis- ing to a wide range of marketing efforts. For instance, stations earn additional rev- enue by broadcasting from a business, such as a dance club. Businesses also sponsor concerts or other promotions that are organized by a station. In return for sponsorship, the businesses are usually allowed to set up a booth or post large signs at the event.


Continuity directors schedule and produce commercials. Continuity direc- tors carefully schedule commercials, tak- ing into account both the timeslot in which a commercial is to be played, as well as competing advertisements. For example, two car dealership advertisements should not be played during the same commercial break. Continuity directors also create and produce advertisements for clients who do not produce their own.


Large stations and networks general- ly have several workers who spend all of their time handling sales. Sales worker


managers coordinate all radio and tele- vision station activities. In very small sta- tions, the manager and a bookkeeper may handle all of the accounting, purchasing, hiring, and other routine office work. In larger stations, the general administrative staff includes business managers, accountants, lawyers, personnel workers, public relations workers, and others. These professionals are assisted by office and administrative support workers, such as secre- taries, word processors, typists, and financial clerks.


Training and Advancement Professional, management, and sales occupations generally require a college degree; technical occupations often do not. It is easier to obtain employment and gain promotions with a degree, especially in larger, more competitive markets. Advanced schooling generally is required for supervisory positions—including technical occupations—having greater responsibility and higher salaries. Entry-level jobs in news or program production increasingly require a college degree and some broadcast experience.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112