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energy wise


Vote YES Cont’d


Save Money


On Vacation Lower your energy usage while you’re away from home.


waste energy while you’re away. Before you load your suitcases into the car:


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• Turn off the heat pump or air conditioner, or set the thermostat to 85 to 90 degrees if there’s something in the house that could suffer heat damage such as house plants.


• Empty the refrigerator and unplug if possible. Remember that as your house grows warmer, a manual- defrost refrigerator may run twice as much as usual, and self-defrosting models can run an additional 20 to 30 percent, trying to keep food cool. Clean it out thoroughly and prop open the door to prevent mildew growth.


• Empty the freezer as well: If you leave it on while turning off your AC, it can eat into your energy savings as it works harder to stay cold.


he arrival of summer can mean long weekends away or even an extended family vacation. Don’t let your house


• Unplug computers, televisions, lamps, and all electronics. These devices will continue to pull electricity, even when they aren’t in use. Chances are your desktop computer, laptop, tablet, phone, printer and scanner all “live” near each other. To make it easy, plug them all into a surge- protector power strip. That way, you have to pull only one plug to disconnect them all before you leave your home for an extended time.


• Leave a light or two on so bad guys won’t know you’re away, but be sure to connect them to programmable timers that will turn them on and off at the times you specify. Aside from saving energy, the on-and-off lights will make your home appear occupied.


For more energy saving tips, please visit togetherwesave.com, or contact your co-op at 888-832-3362.


On another occasion, volunteer firemen fought to head off a grass fire sparked by a copper thief who pulled down an energized meter loop. The Bessie and Clinton fire departments were Johnny-on- the-spot and contained the blaze quickly.


I visit the Cordell Hospital often for routine blood work. I know one of the doctors and many of the staff who work in this rural facility. Every year they provide a week of health screening for Washita County residents at reduced rates.


I think about all the “routine” tasks that are part of the daily business in fire departments, ambulance services and hospitals. Tasks like saving lives and protecting homes and property. I think about the Kiwash employees who serve as volunteer firemen. They rush home after working their “real job,”putting in a 10-hour work day, so they can spend a little time with their loved ones—until the phone rings. I know EMT’s, firemen, doctors, nurses, and staff that would love to help with their kid’s homework, coach a Little League game, or take care of something on their never ending “to-do” list at home— if only they weren’t on call.


The decision on June 24 is a tough one. A Yes vote to fund the Washita County Fire Departments and Ambulance Services will reduce funding for the hospital, while a Yes vote on the hospital tax will eliminate funding for the fire and ambulance services.


ENERGY EFFICIENCY Tip of the Month


When replacing incandescent bulbs from recessed light fixtures, use energy-efficient bulbs that are rated for that purpose. For example, the heat buildup in downlights will significantly shorten the life of spiral CFLs.


Source: Department of Energy


Opinions and negative advertising aside, it’s time for you to decide for yourself. Whatever the outcome of this vote, the hospital will not close, nor will the volunteer firemen or EMT’s give up in despair. After all, they are all professionals.


The great thing about this country is your ability to vote; and it is your obligation as a U.S. citizen to do so. More than ever, your vote counts! Please exercise your privilege on June 24.


Kilowatt | MAY 2014 | 3


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