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Safe food makes outdoor meal a picnic


• Invest in a well-insulated cooler that’s roomy enough for plenty of ice and your hot dogs, hamburgers, chicken, deviled eggs, potato and pasta salads, re- frigerated condiments like mayonnaise, and creamy desserts.


• Wash your hands before and after touching food— especially raw poultry and meat.


Ants and bees are a bother during a summer picnic. Food poisoning is downright dangerous. Keep your friends and family safe when you bring food outdoors by taking care with food preparation, packing and storage. Here’s how:


• If you have to thaw frozen meat overnight before the picnic, leave it in the refrigerator. Leaving meat out on a counter overnight can cause it to spoil. And don’t partially cook the meat before you bring it to the cookout; that also can cause it to spoil. Best prac- tices: Cook the meat fully at home and store it in the refrigerator until party time, or bring thawed, raw meat to the barbecue site and cook it thoroughly on the grill when you get there.


• Find a shady spot to serve the food. Serve it quickly, and then put it back into the cooler as soon as pos- sible. On a 90-degree day, food can spoil if it sits out of the cooler for more than an hour.


• Measure the temperature of grilled meat with a food thermometer to make sure it’s fully cooked.


• Once you put raw meat on a plate, don’t use that plate for anything else—even to serve that same meat once it’s cooked. Use clean plates and utensils to serve and eat cooked food.


• To tote leftovers home, place them in the cooler, and unpack them in refrigerator as soon as you get home. If any of the food is warm when you get it home, throw it away.


Remember Father’


Remember Father’s Day


Daniel Robles completes climbing school at the OAEC training facility


Daniel Robles completes climbing school at the OAEC training facility


Sunday, June 14, 2014


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