This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
our Electrical Safety Look-Up and pay close attention to the location of


overhead power lines


Harvest season is one of the busiest, and most dangerous, times on the farm. Whether running combines in the fields, filling semis and grain bins, or moving equipment, the Safe Electricity program urges farm workers to look up and pay close attention to the location of overhead power lines and to keep equipment far away from them.


“The harvest rush can lead to farmers working long days with little sleep,” cautions Molly Hall, executive director of the Safe Electricity program. “Make sure to take the time to note the location of power lines.” One of the biggest hazards for farmers is posed by power lines. Typically, power lines over streets and rural areas have a minimal clearance of 18 feet and 12.5 feet over residen- tial private property. To stay safe around over- head power lines, Safe Elec- tricity urges farm operators and workers to:


Use a spotter when operating large machinery near lines. Use care when rais- ing augers or the bed of grain trucks around power lines.


Keep equipment at least 10 feet from lines—at all times, in all directions.


Inspect the height of the 3


farm equipment to determine clearance.


Always remember to lower ex- tensions when moving loads. Never attempt to move a power line out of the way or raise it for clearance.


If a power line is sagging or


low, call the local utility immedi- ately.


“Always remember to peri- odically look up and be aware of your surroundings,” Hall adds. “If you can’t safely pass under a power line, choose a different path.”


If contact is made with a power line, remember, it is almost always safest to stay on the equipment. Do not step down from the cab. Make sure to warn others to stay away, and call the local utility provider immediately. The only reason to exit is if the equipment is on fire. If this is the case, jump off the equipment with your feet together and without touching the ground and vehicle at the same time. Then, still keeping your feet together, “bunny hop” away.


Power lines are not the only danger to agricultural work- ers. According to a national census by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the U.S. Depart- ment of Labor, there were 138 agricultural worker deaths in 2011. Reasons for these fatali- ties include, but are not limited to, roadway collisions, falls/ slips/trips, and being struck by objects or equipment.


Additional safety tips from Safe Electricity include:


Do not use metal poles when breaking up bridged grain in- side and around bins. Always hire qualified electri- cians for any electrical issues. Do not use equipment with frayed cables.


Make sure outdoor outlets are equipped with ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs). When operating a portable generator, make sure nothing is plugged into it when turn- ing it on, and never operate a generator in a confined area. Generators can produce toxic and deadly gasses like carbon monoxide.


Always use cau- tion when operating heavy machinery. For more farm and electrical safety information, visit SafeElectricity.org.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168