This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
All food is prepared at the church’s com- mercial kitchen.


“We put out a schedule once a month on our website so we know what we are going to cook that week,” said Foster. “We have buyers who go out and pur- chase the fresh food items that we can’t purchase from a wholesaler.”


Foster said the entire operation depends on charitable contributions.


“We are totally funded by donations,” she said. “But in the fi ve years I’ve been doing this we’ve never run out of mon- ey. When there is a need, people rise to the occasion. They donate the money we need and volunteer their time. They never ask. They know where their mon- ey goes. They know that food is going out and people are getting fed.”


The $2,500 from Operation Round-Up was a signifi cant contribution for the program.


“It was wonderful,” Foster said. “In fact, I spent $800 of it last week on food. It doesn’t take long. When you think about it, we buy almost $50 worth of milk each week. We provide things they wouldn’t be able to get otherwise.”


Foster said the client list is compiled from referrals from home health profes- sionals and family members.


“It is all word of mouth,” she said.


Volunteer help is always appreciated, too, said Foster.


“If anyone is interested in volunteering to cook or deliver, we’d love to hear from them. Some of our volunteers are seasonal. Some are retirees. Volunteers are always welcome,” she said.” We have people from all over helping out. Some are from Tulsa who just come up here on weekends. When they come up here, they work on Friday.


Foster added: “It is great way to get to meet people in this area. You really


June 2014 - 5


get to know the people you cook with. When I fi rst moved up here, I didn’t know anyone. Now I feel like I know everybody. It is good way to meet some very nice people.”


She also commended the South Grand Lake Christian Church for providing a base for the operation.


“The church has really been good to us. The way I understand it, they built that kitchen just for this cause. The program was originally started by the church and we do have quite a few volunteers from the church. If we have a need, they are really good about helping us fi ll it.”


Small change that changes lives A total of $18,758.25 in grants were awarded to nine diff erent organizations during the March meeting of the Trust Foundation Board, which meets every other month to disburse funds. The largest grant awarded was a check for $4,200 that the Fairland Roundup Club used to purchase lights for its arena. Another $4,000 grant went to help the Abundant Blessings Center in Grove, a pregnancy support organization, to make repairs to its roof.


Operation Round-Up truly is an amazing demonstration of the care and concern


Northeast Oklahoma Electric Coopera- tive members have for their friends and neighbors.


The cooperative adopted Operation Round-Up in 1998. Approximately 300 co-ops across the U.S. now implement the program as a way to positively im- pact the communities where they serve.


The co-op is humbled by all that has been accomplished over the past fi fteen years. During that time, more than $2 million has been allocated to needy causes throughout its service territory of Craig, Mayes, Delaware, Ottawa and Rogers counties.


What is remarkable is how little Opera- tion Round-Up asks of each contributor in proportion to the amount of good it does. Our cooperative rolled out the program with the slogan Small Change that Changes Lives. That description is no less fi tting today.


Operation Round-Up does just what its name implies. Each month, our coopera- tive simply “rounds up” the electric bills of participating members to the next highest dollar.


As a voluntary program, Operation Round-Up relies on member partici-





Cindy White (left) and Sherry Lemons put the fi nishing seal on meals ready for delivery.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168