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Beat the Heat Proper maintenance and smart use of your home’s


cooling system will help keep your electric bill in check.


➤ Make sure your air conditioner’s external unit is clean and free of debris. Clear away dead leaves or overgrown plants and weeds to enable the unit to


perform as it should. ➤ Change all the air filters inside your home quarterly, (more often in homes with allergy sufferers or smokers). Fresh filters not only reduce the strain on your cooling


system, but improve the air quality in your home. ➤ Set your home’s thermostat as high as possible while still maintaining a comfortable environment during the summer months. Bumping up the thermostat at least two degrees can make a noticeable difference on your power bill while making little to no difference to your comfort level. Investing in a programmable thermostat can lead to even greater savings by automatically adjusting the temperature to respond to on- and off- peak time periods and turning off the system when you are away.


RESIDENTIAL RATE SCHEDULE Spring Shoulder Rate


for bills calculated in April and May


Service Availability Charge...................60¢/day Energy Charge – all kWh...........11.5252¢/kWh


for bills calculated in June*


Service Availability Charge...................60¢/day Energy Charge – on-peak kWh25.6688¢/kWh all other kWh................................11.5252¢/kWh


Summer Rate* for bills calculated July, August and September


Service Availability Charge.....................60¢/day Energy Charge – on-peak kWh25.6688¢/kWh Energy Charge – off-peak kWh10.2688¢/kWh


*Does not include Cost Adjustment Factor


Made in the Shade Windows are not only great sources of natural light


in your home, but also great sources of heat during the summer. Curtains, blinds, and shades are some of the most cost-effective ways to make your windows and home more energy efficient. Tese window coverings offer low-cost, stylish solutions to shield the sun’s rays and keep the interior of your home cool and comfortable. Proper weather stripping and caulking around window panes and casings will also improve the function of your windows by keeping the cool air in and the hot air out. Solar film applied to your home’s existing windows will further repel the summer heat.


Daily Grind Today’s appliances are more energy efficient than


ever, performing better and using less electricity than they did in the past. Despite their functionality and efficiency, most major household appliances give off heat when in use. During peak daytime temperatures, the residual heat from appliances can put an unnecessary strain on your home’s cooling system and send your power bill soaring. Cooler temperatures in the early morning or late evening make these ideal times for running the dishwasher or washing and drying clothes. When possible, turn off your dishwasher’s drying cycle or use the "energy saver" option. Tis prevents even more residual heat from warming your home and saves on your bill. Washing your clothes in cold water and hanging them out to dry are also great ways to reduce your household energy consumption.


As summer heats up, you can count on Oklahoma


Electric Cooperative to keep you cool. Give us a call (405-321-2024) for advice on ways to lower your electric consumption. You can also visit TogetherWeSave.com to find out how little changes around the house can add up to big energy savings and keep an eye out for Peak, the power-saving pup. Where Peak goes, power-saving tips are sure to follow.


June 2014 News Magazine 9


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