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Powerful Living


Senate Bill 1456 signed into law by Gov. Fallin By Sid Sperry


T


he Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) recent- ly joined Oklahoma Gas and Electric (OG&E) and Public Service Company of Oklahoma (PSO) in supporting passage of Senate Bill 1456, a legislative measure that helps ensure typical customers of elec- tric utilities won’t be subsidizing those who choose to install various forms of distributed generation, including solar and wind installations. The Bill, whose principal author was State Sen. A. J. Griffi n (R-Guthrie), passed both the Oklahoma State Senate (41 – 0) and the Oklahoma House of Representatives (83 – 5), and was signed into law by Gov. Mary Fallin on April 14, 2014. “The intent of this Bill is to protect all Oklahoma customers and encourage all forms of Oklahoma energy use,” said Fallin while authorizing an Executive Order implementing certain provisions of the Bill. The Bill does not mandate tariffs or other increases for distributed generation customers. Griffin’s bipartisan bill was supported in the Oklahoma House of


Representative’s by principal House author, Rep. Mike Turner (R-Edmond). Other House authors included Rep. Jon Echols (R-Oklahoma City), Rep. Mike Jackson (R-Enid), Rep. Tom Newell (R-Seminole), Rep. Colby Schwartz (R-Yukon), Rep. Jason Murphey (R-Guthrie), Rep. David Brumbaugh (R-Broken Arrow), Rep. Anastasia Pittman (D-Oklahoma City), Rep. Wade Rousselot (D-Wagoner) and Rep. Dan Fisher (R-El Reno).


Key provisions of the Bill include: ✓ No retail electric supplier shall increase


rates charged or enforce a surcharge above that required to recover the full costs necessary to serve customers who install distributed genera- tion on the customer side of the meter after November 1, 2014.


✓ No retail electric supplier shall allow cus-


tomers with distributed generation installed after November 1, 2014, to be subsidized by cus- tomers in the same class of service who do not have distributed generation.


A Picture of Restoration Submit your photos for the 2015 OKL Calendar Contest


From the Editor I ✓ A higher fi xed charge for customers within


the same class of service that have distributed generation installed after November 1, 2014, as compared to the fi xed charges of those custom- ers who do not have distributed generation, is a means to avoid subsidization between custom- ers within that class of service, and shall be deemed in the public interest.


✓ Retail electric suppliers shall implement


tariffs in compliance with this act no later than December 31, 2015.


Chris Meyers, OAEC executive vice president, said Senate Bill 1456 protects the average utility customer by preventing unintended cost shifting. “As Governor Fallin noted in her Executive Order, prior to implementation


of any fi xed charges, this Bill allows the Corporation Commission and electric cooperative boards and management to consider the use of all available alterna- tives, including other rate forms such as increased time-of-use rates, minimum bills, and demand charges,” Meyers said. “A proper and required examination of these and other rate reforms will ensure that Oklahoma appropriately imple- ments the Governor’s ‘Oklahoma First Energy Plan’ while protecting future distributed generation customers.”


Distributed Generation: Small generating units designed to supplement or be a partial substitute for power generated at large generating plants. Typically located at or near the point of use.


’m writing this column on the one- year anniversary of the May 20, 2013 tornado that took away precious lives of several Oklahomans, including chil- dren. It is hard to believe a year has passed since devastating EF5s ravaged Oklahoma destroying homes, businesses and—for some—taking the lives of those they loved. In the wake of this catastrophic event,


Anna Politano Managing Editor, Oklahoma Living


Oklahomans showed astounding resilience, courage and the unwavering hope to see a “new” day. For many of us, the past year did not include a life-changing event like rebuilding a home from scratch or coping with the loss of a loved one who was taken away too soon by a tornado. Read this month’s OKL cover story, “A State of Recovery,” (Page 14) and you will immediately begin counting your blessings. This story is an inspiring account of how three Oklahoma fami- lies spent the last year, coping with losses, but graciously “rising from rubble” to see a new day. These families, and many others within our state, have seen fi rsthand the love and compassion of their neighbors—both locally and nationally. OKL readers are certainly part of this story. Funds collected from last year’s OKL Calendar Photo Contest submissions and funds generated from sales of calendars went to aid tornado vic- tims through the Touchstone Energy Oklahoma Disaster Relief Fund, Inc. To all who submitted photos and purchased calendars, our staff would like to send a heartfelt “Thank You.” With your help, OKL raised more than $2,100 to aid families impacted by last year’s tornadoes within cooperative service territories. As resilient people, we know that together we are stronger. We are neighbors helping neighbors—and the OKL readership has done just that. Whether you submitted photos or purchased cal- endars, your help and participation are appreciated. We have recently begun accepting submissions for the 2015


OKL Calendar Contest. As always, all profi ts made from the sales of the calendar will be designated to a worthy cause. Our staff encourages you to continue this tradition and submit photos for the 2015 OKL Calendar by August 5, 2014. You will not only be considered for a $300 grand prize, or a $50 gift card, but you will be contributing to a great cause, making a difference in someone’s life. After all, in the end, isn’t that what matters most?


Submit your photos today at: http://www.ok-living.coop/con- tests/.


Scan here to submit your photos for the 2015 Calendar Contest


JUNE 2014 5


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