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NOVEMBER 2013 F Kilowatt 3 the WAYS TO SAVE


Save Energy on Turkey Day Make holiday cooking easier and more efficient


t can take days for a frozen- solid Thanksgiving turkey to thaw out in the refrigerator- -about 24 hours for each five pounds. Believe it or not, that forces the fridge to work harder than usual.


I


Buy a fresh turkey instead and save some energy. Note the "sell by" date on the turkey's label; your turkey will maintain optimal quality and safety for up to two days past that deadline.


Here are a few more energy- saving turkey tips:


• If you're hosting a small holiday celebration, consider cooking only part of the turkey so you won't have to roast it for so long and you won't have so many leftovers to store. Roasting just a breast or the legs and thighs--or buying a super-small bird--will take less energy to prepare and create less waste when you can't finish all of the leftovers.


• Between basting the bird and baking the pies, your oven will be running practically non-stop from the day before Thanksgiving to the evening of. That means your house is going to be warmer than usual. So turn your thermostat down a few degrees. You'll stay comfortable while saving energy.


• If you cook your mashed potatoes and other side dishes while the


turkey is still in the oven, your cooktop will use less energy. If those sides require time in the oven, prepare them in class or ceramic pans, which allow you to turn the oven temperature down by up to 25 degrees--without adding cooking time.


• Unless you are roasting or broiling for more than an hour, there's no need to preheat your oven.


• Don't boil your food. It robs it of flavor and nutrients. Instead, bring the liquid almost to a boil, and then immediately lower the temperature and let the food simmer until it's cooked.


• The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking a thawed, stuffed, 16 pound turkey--the average size--for four to 4.5 hours.


. Shop Now For LED Holiday Lights


LED holiday decorations use up to 90 percent less electricity than traditional holiday lights, and they last over dozens of holiday seasons. For this reason—and a significant drop in price— LED lights tend to sell out fast at retail


stores. If you're switching to energy- efficient LED decorations, start shopping now.


If you're still pondering the decision, consider this safety advantage: LEDs are cooler to the touch, so they are unlikely to catch your live tree on fire.


A FEW THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT


Daylight Savings Time Ends. Set your clock back one hour on November 2, the end of Daylight Savings Time. If you find your home and property too much "in the dark," consider a security light from your co-op. Kiwash Electric offers a $25 rebate for first- time installation of a 150 watt high pressure sodium security light; and a $40 rebate for a 200-400 watt high pressure sodium security light. Contact us today for more information. 888-832-3362 or visit www.kiwash.coop.


Recipe Box


Turkey on the Grill INGREDIENTS


12 pounds whole turkey 2 cups water


3 tablespoons chicken bouillon powder 2 teaspoons garlic powder 2 teaspoons onion powder 1 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1/2 teaspoon chopped parsley 1 teaspoon paprika


DIRECTIONS


Prepare an outdoor grill for indirect medium heat, and lightly oil grate. Rinse turkey, and pat dry.


Place turkey breast side down on the prepared grill. Sear turkey on both sides until skin is golden to dark brown.


In a large roasting pan, mix together the water, bouillon powder, garlic powder, onion powder, poultry seasoning, parsley, and paprika.


Place turkey breast side down in the roasting pan. Scoop the pan mixture over the turkey. Cover tightly with foil and place on grill.


Grill 3 to 4 hours, until the internal temperature of the thigh reaches 180° F. Remove turkey from grill and let stand 15 minutes before carving.


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