This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Save Some Energy on Turkey Day


t can take days for a frozen- solid Thanksgiving turkey to thaw out in the refrigerator- -about 24 hours for each five pounds- -and believe it or not, that forces the fridge to work harder than usual. Buy a fresh turkey instead and save some energy. Note the “sell by” date on the turkey’s label; your turkey will maintain optimal quality and safety for up to two days past that deadline.


I


Here are a few more energy-sav- ing turkey tips: • If you’re hosting a small holi- day celebration, consider cooking only part of the turkey so you won’t have to roast it for so long and you won’t have so many leftovers to store. Roasting just a breast or the legs and thighs--or buying a super-small bird--will take less energy to prepare and create less waste when you can’t finish all of the leftovers. • Between basting the bird and baking the pies, your oven will be run- ning practically non-stop from the day before Thanksgiving to the evening of. That means your house is going to be warmer than usual. So turn your thermostat down a few degrees. You’ll stay comfortable while saving energy. • If you cook your mashed po- tatoes and other side dishes while the turkey is still in the oven, your cook- top will use less energy. If those sides require time in the oven, prepare them in class or ceramic pans, which allow you to turn the oven temperature down by up to 25 degrees--without adding cooking time. • Unless you are roasting or broiling for more than an hour, there’s no need to preheat your oven.


• Don’t boil your food. It robs it of flavor and nutrients. Instead, bring the liquid almost to a boil, and then immediately lower the tempera- ture and let the food simmer until it’s cooked.


• The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking a thawed, stuffed, 16-pound turkey--the average size--for four to 4.5 hours.


Use Space Heaters Safely As the weather gets a little bit


chillier--but perhaps not cold enough to run the central heat--space heaters in the rooms you use most might be all you need.


While most models are perfectly safe to operate, how you use them can mean the difference between a con- venient appliance and the cause of a house fire.


Prevent a handy space heater from creating a disaster at your home by following a few simple precautions: • If your space heater is old, check the cord for fraying or cracking and notice if it overheats. • Consider replacing an older model with a new space heater. Most modern space heaters come with anti-tipping devices and automatically shut themselves off in case they do tip over, which could prevent them from catching the carpet on fire. • Check the news and the Con- sumer Product Safety Commission’s Web site (www.cpsc.gov) to keep up-to-date with recalls. Last winter, CPSC recalled one popular brand’s models after testing by Consumer Reports revealed that they were quick to catch fabric on fire. • Even if your model is rated


for safety, keep it at least three feet away from combustible materials like furniture, drapes and beds. • If you need to use an exten- sion cord with your space heater, choose a heavy-duty one: at least 14-gauge wire.


• Keep the heater’s cord and the extension cord in plain sight. Tucked under carpets or furniture, they can overheat or become damaged when people step on them. • Do not use any gasoline-pow- ered appliance indoors. • Avoid plugging two space heaters into the same outlet, which will probably trip the circuit. Same goes for using a space heater on the same circuit as a hair dryer or other energy-intensive appliance.


Hidden


Account Number If you see your account


number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your electric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newsletter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account


number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154