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Safety


Protect Electronics, Prevent Hazards Big-ticket electronics, such


as televisions, computers, and gaming consoles, are at the top of many holiday wish lists—but safety may not be. Purchasing, installing, and operating these items safely protects not only the expensive equipment, but also your entire home. The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) offers the following tips, and for more information, visit holidaysafety.org.


Safety tips • Always purchase electrical devices from a reputable retailer that you trust. Be especially wary when making online purchases. • Check that all electrical items are certified by a nationally rec- ognized testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL), Canadian Standards Asso- ciation (CSA), or Intertek (ETL). • Always read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions be- fore use. • Send warranty and product registration forms for new items to manufacturers in order to be notified about product recalls. Recall information is also avail- able on the website of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Com- mission (http://www.cpsc.gov). • Never install an exterior tele- vision or radio antenna close enough to contact power lines if it falls. • Never remove the ground pin (the third prong) to make a three- prong plug fit into a two-prong


4 • Kay Electric Cooperative


outlet. • All appliances and cords should be kept in good condi- tion. Examine them regularly for damage, and repair or dispose of damaged items. • Keep cords out of reach of children and pets. • Make sure entertainment cen- ters and computer workstations have enough space around them for ventilation of electronic equip- ment. • Keep liquids, including drinks, away from electrical devices. Spills can result in dangerous shocks or fires. • Unplug equipment when not in use to save energy and re- duce the risks for shocks or fires. Power strips or surge protectors make a good central turn-off point. • Always unplug electrical items by grasping the plug firmly rather than pulling on the cord. • If you receive any kind of shock from a large appliance or any other electrical device, stop using it until an electrician has checked it. • If an appliance smokes or sparks, or if you feel a tingle or light shock when it’s on, stop using it. Discard and replace it or have it repaired by an authorized service provider.


Extension cords


• Extension cords are meant to provide a temporary solution. They should not be used as a long-term or permanent electrical


The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) offers the following tips, and for more information, visit holidaysafety.org.


circuit. • Never use a cord that feels hot or is damaged in any way. Touch- ing even a single exposed strand can result in an electric shock or burn. • Only use weather-resistant, heavy gauge extension cords marked “for outdoor use” outside. • Keep all outdoor extension cords clear of snow and standing water. • Arrange furniture so that there are outlets available for equip- ment without the use of exten- sion cords. • Do not place power cords or extension cords in high traffic areas or under carpets, rugs, or furniture (to avoid overheating and tripping hazards), and never nail or staple them to the wall or baseboard. 1068401


Surge protector or power strip?


Although surge protectors and power strips both allow you to plug several devices in one lo- cation, it is important for consum- ers to understand that they are not interchangeable. A true surge protector includes internal com- ponents that divert or suppress the extra current from surges, protecting your valuable electron- ics from electrical spikes, while a power strip simply provides more outlets for a circuit.


Source: Electrical Safety Foundation International


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