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Top 10 Holiday Safety Tips


1. Inspect electrical decorations for damage before use. Cracked or damaged sockets, loose or bare wires, and loose connections may cause serious shock or start a fire.


2. Do not overload electrical outlets. Overloaded electrical outlets and faulty wires are a common cause of holiday fires. Avoid overloading outlets and plug only one high-wattage appliance into each outlet at a time.


3. Never Connect more than three strings of incandescent lights. More than three strands may not only blow a fuse, but can also cause a fire.


4. Keep tree fresh by watering daily. Dry trees are a serious fire hazard.


5. Use battery-operated candles. Candles start almost half of home decoration fires (NFPA).


6. Keep combustibles at least three feet from heat sources. A heat source too close to a decoration was a factor in half of home fires that began with decorations. (NFPA).


7. Protect cords from damage. To avoid shock or fire hazards, cords should never be pinched by furniture, forced into small spaces such as doors or windows, placed under rugs, located near heat sources, or attached by nails or staples.


8. Check decorations for certification label. Decorations not bearing a label from an independent testing laboratory such as Underwriters Laboratories(UL), Canadian Standards Association(CSA) or Intertek(ETL) have not been tested for safety and could be hazardous.


9. Stay in the kitchen when something is cooking. Unattended cooking equipment is the leading cause of home cooking fires (NFPA).


10. Turn off, unplug, and extinguish all decorations when going to sleep or leaving the house. Unattended candles are the cause of one in five home candle fires. Half of home fire deaths occur between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. (NFPA).


Stressed over holiday cooking? ...Laugh it off!


Stressed out over having company, cooking a perfect


turkey and making sure everyone at the table gets his or her favorite side dish? Laughter, as they say, is the best medicine. And, you know, misery loves company. Here are some funny-but true-mishaps other turkey


“chefs” like you have confessed over the years to the operators of Butterball’s Turkey Talk-Line, a call center for last-minute questions from panicked home cooks during the holidays. 71202 A Kentucky woman had barely turned her back on


her Thanksgiving turkey for a moment when her tiny pet Chihuahua climbed inside of it and couldn’t get out. The woman shook the bird and tugged on the dog, but the little guy was stuck. She finally freed her dog by carefully cutting the opening of the cavity to give Fido room to shimmy through it.


Some callers are panicked by last-minute turkey trouble.


But a nervous Georgia woman planning to prepare her first bird got her info well in advance, calling the Talk-Line on Thanksgiving Day - a year before she was to host the dinner. Another cook called in to ask how long it would take to roast her turkey. The Talk-Line’s home economist asked how


much the bird weighed, but the woman didn’t know - yet. Turns out, the turkey was still very much alive and running around outside in the woman’s yard. The guest list for one California family’s dinner included a vegetarian. The hostess called to ask how to prepare a turkey so the vegetarian could eat it. Everyone at one West Coast woman’s table prefers white


meat over dark. So the cook bleached the dark pieces to turn them white. When she called in to find out how to clean off the bleach, she was, of course, advised to throw the ruined bird away.


of


Best for last: One home economist recounts the story a


woman who


needed help finding a frozen turkey big enough to feed her large family, so she asked a stock boy at the grocery store, “Do these turkeys get any bigger?” The stock


boy replied,


“No ma’am, they’re dead.”


J


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