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Prairie Flavors High Brass Hunting Preserve A meal worth the shot


Melanie Baugus and Carolynn Beason making manicotti.


Carolynn Beason makes muscadine jelly. C “


ome as friends, leave as family,” is the spirit of hospitality that prevails at High Brass Hunting Preserve in Grant, Okla. Sportsmen come from across the United States to hunt quail, chukar, and pheasant on its 900 acres.


Choctaw Electric Cooperative members Bucky and Carolynn Beason started


High Brass Hunting Preserve in 2010 with the help of Bucky’s daughter, Melanie Baugus and her husband Mark. “We were sitting around the campfi re one night, talking about raising upland birds and Bucky said, ‘Let’s make it happen,’” Mark recalled. “That was in April. We opened in September.”


High Brass has grown 600 percent each year since opening, and hosted 1,800 hunters last season. In the off-season, the Beason and Baugus families keep busy, building new barns and raising birds. In 2013, they built four new barns and hatched 30,000 quail, 4,500 chukars and 6,500 pheasants, along with shipping eggs across the country. Their goal is to eventually hatch 200,000 per season. But High Brass is not only known for its hunting; it’s also famous for its friendly, Okie hospitality and made-from-scratch meals. “We give hunters a million-dollar experience without a million-dollar price tag,” Carolynn said. Hunters begin the day with a hearty breakfast before heading into the fi eld. At noon, they return to the lodge for one of Carolynn’s home-cooked lunches. A few of the midday favorites are sausage and spinach manicotti, Salisbury steak and Indian tacos with peach dumplings a la mode for dessert. Hunters go back into the fi eld for a few hours before relaxing around the campfi re. The evening meal features a variety of hors d’oeuvres like chukar and quail legs, pickled sirloin with crackers, jalapeno pepper poppers, chorizo and beef wontons and Carolynn’s famous artichoke fritters, along with beef stew and cornbread. “We serve anything you can fi nd in a restaurant—but better,” Carolynn said. “One hunter from Arkansas said he didn’t care if he didn’t fi re a shot; the food was worth the trip.” To read more about High Brass Hunting Preserve and for more of their most- popular recipes visit Oklahoma Living’s digital edition at www.ok-living.coop. Visit www.highbrasshunting.com or call 580-326-7759 for more information on High Brass Hunting Preserve.


24 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP Chukar Legs


Chukar Legs Serves 6 to 8


✓ 1 ½ pounds chukar legs (about 18 legs)* ✓ 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt


✓ ¼ teaspoon ground black pep- per ✓ 3/4 teaspoon garlic powder ✓ 1/3 cup fl our ✓ 2 tablespoons canola oil ✓ Hot sauce, such as Frank’s ✓ Burgundy wine


Preheat the oven to 350°F. Sea- son chukar legs with salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Dredge in fl our. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Brown both sides of the legs and transfer them to a baking sheet. Cover the baking sheet with foil and bake for 45 minutes. If desired, baste with hot sauce and wine. *Quail legs can be substi- tuted.


If viewing our digital edition, click here to check extra delicious recipes from the High Brass Hunting Preserve. Access our digital edition at www.ok-living. coop or fi nd our FREE app at the Apple Newsstand, Google Play or Amazon.


By Laura Araujo


Melanie and Mark Baugus and Carolynn Beason along with Bucky Beason (not pictured) started the High Brass Hunting Preserve.


Photos by Laura Araujo


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