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January 2013


NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


Page 3 Stay warm and save energy this winter By Madeline Keimig, Touchstone Energy®


money and energy. According to a poll by the Consumer Reports Na- tional Research Center, four out of 10 consumers are worried about money this holiday season.


O


The average family spends $2,024 a year on energy; nearly half of that goes towards heating and cooling costs. Stay warm and save energy with these helpful winter tips: • Check furnace filters. Be sure to clean or replace your heating and cool- ing system’s air filter. At a minimum change the filter every three months; a dirty filter clogs the system, making the system work harder to keep you warm. • Install a programmable thermo-


stat. Is your home alone most of the day? Programmable thermostats can knock up to 10 percent off heating bills with the ability to automatically


Hidden account number contest


Congratulations to Gerald


Jaquith for recognizing his number in last month’s newsletter. The other number belonged to Marc Madden. We have hidden two account


numbers somewhere in the articles in this newsletter. The numbers will always be enclosed in parentheses and will look similar to this example (XXXXXX). If you recognize your account


number, all you have to do is give us a call on or before the 8th of the current month and we’ll give you a credit on your bill for the amount stated. This month’s numbers are worth $50 each. Happy hunting!


2 cups pineapple juice 2 cups orange juice 2 juiced lemons 1 gallon apple juice 2 sticks cinnamon 8 cloves


1 1/4 cup brown sugar dash almond extract


Combine the above ingredients and simmer for 20 minutes. Editor’s Note: Wassail was traditionally a hot drink made of ale,


sherry, sugar, and spices, with pieces of toast and roasted apples floating in it. It is the legendary drink served on the Feast of the Three Kings with an oversized, decorated sweet yeast bread. The word wassail is derived from the Anglo-Saxon toast waes haeil, or “be whole.” On Christmas or Twelfth Night, revelers would carry a large bowl from door to door, ask- ing for it to be filled, a custom known as wassailing. There are now many versions of wassail and this is the one NWEC serves during open house.


n top of staying warm through- out the winter months, a lot of people worry about saving


Cooperatives


turn temperatures down 10 to 15 de- grees for 8 hours a day. • Insulate water heaters and pipes.


Wrap water pipes connected to the wa- ter heater with foam, and insulate the water heater, too. To save about $75 annually, consider lowering the water heater temperature from 130 degrees to 120. • Bundle up your home. The more heat that escapes from cracks, the more cold air enters, causing your system to work harder and use more energy. Use an incense stick to spot air leaks. When it’s windy outside, hold a lit incense stick near your windows, doors, and electrical outlets. If the smoke blows sideways, you’ve got a leak that should be plugged with weather-stripping, caulk, or expand- able foam. Want more ways to save? Take the home energy savings tour and see how little changes add up to big savings at www.TogetherWeSave.com.


Change your heating and cooling system’s air filter the filter at least every three months; a dirty filter clogs the system, making the system work harder to keep you warm. Source: Touchstone Energy Cooperatives


Wassail


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