This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
your CO-OP PAGE 6 JANUARY 2013 LET’S SAVE ENERGY TOGETHER


Whopper TVs equal bigger bills If you must have a big screen, make it an efficient one


BY JOHN DRAKE cooperative energy auditor


operate than a new, basic refrigerator. H


The U.S. Energy Information Administration says that 44 percent of American homes have three or more television sets. Last year alone, U.S. consumers purchased some 40 million new TVs with an average screen size of 50 inches! It all adds up to higher bills.


If Santa brought you a great big TV this year, or if you plan to buy one for yourself, here are some tips to consider:


Display Tactics


Three parts of a TV impact energy use: display technology, screen size, and resolution. Plasma and liquid-crystal display (LCD) are the two most popular types of display technologies. Plasma screens generally the largest energy user, mainly because their large 42-inch to 65- inch screens typically draw between 240 watts to 400 watts.


LCD TVs don’t need much power to operate, about 111 watts on average. Most LCD screens range in size from 21 inches to 49 inches. These TVs fall into two categories: those with cold-cathode fluorescent lamps to illuminate the screen; and backlit models using a light-emitting diode (LED). LED units offer notably better picture quality and thinner and lighter screens. They also use slightly less energy, at 101 watts.


ere’s something you may not be aware of: Some big screen TVs— when used an average of five hours per day—can cost more to


In 2012, Sharp’s Aquos LCD TV claimed the top three spots on Top Ten USA’s most energy-efficient large screen television list, ranked by watts of electricity used per square inch of screen.


Remember that the larger the screen, the more energy you’ll drain. And high- definition TVs (HDTV) are impressive but they tend to require more power to generate better picture clarity.


ENERGY STAR Boosts Ratings


The energy efficiency ratings programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) created the first voluntary television efficiency standards in 1998. Today’s ENERGY STAR-qualified screens use, on average, 40 percent less energy than standard models.


Standards are constantly ratcheting up. In 2008, a 50-inch ENERGY STAR-rated television used 318 watts on average. By 2012 50-inch TVs could not drain more than 108 watts. ENERGY STAR provides an online guide that ranks TVs by energy use, size, brand, and display type at www.energystar.gov.


Look for Labels


In 2011, a yellow Energy Guide label became a requirement for TVs. The label compares the annual operating cost of a specific television to the plug-in cost of similar models. This label must be attached to the front of all TVs.


My best advice is, if you must have that whopper TV, try to make it an efficient one.


To visit with a CEC energy use specialist about energy use, free energy audits or loans for energy efficient appliances, please contact John Drake or Mark Zachary at 800- 780-6486, ext. 233.


Tune up your TV


Quick usage tips that boost efficiency •


Turn off the TV and other connected devices when they’re not being used—consider using smart power strips to eliminate continual power draw.





Reduce TV brightness by turning down the LCD backlight— you’ll save energy and still retain good picture quality.


• Turn on the power saver mode.


• Control room lighting. While many energy-saving tips reduce brightness of the screen, you can compensate by dimming lights around your TV.


We offer low interest loans for small and large appliances


800-760-6486 • www.choctawelectric.coop


CEC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140