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CONTROLLABLE IRRIGATION - IT JUST MAKES GOOD SENSE!!


Controllable Irrigation - it sounds as if Harmon Electric wants to be in complete control of your irrigation and how you operate. This is just NOT true. Harmon Electric has developed a rate for irrigation members which signifi cantly lowers the charge to that member, sometimes as much as 85% lower! How is that possible you ask? Harmon Electric puchases power from Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, a generation and transmission cooperative owned by Harmon Electric and 22 other members - all demanding power. As the demand grows, WFEC brings more power generators online and the cost of producing energy rises. If the demand is more than WFEC has readily available, power is purchased on the open market at an even higher price. This high-priced energy during a high consumption period means very high power bills during the summer... and beyond. The price of power throughout any year is based on peak summer usage - June 21 through September 9 - during the previous fi ve years. The cooperative’s demand during this peak period will have a signifi cant impact on your bills.


There is one aspect that we all control - demand - and lowering it from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. on peak days will pay off in the long run. And that is exactly what controllable irrigation does!


This is how it works. Irrigation members wishing to help control peak and lower their bill will sign a controllable irrigation contract which allows Harmon Elecric to install a control device at the irrigation sight. Total load is then controlled by Harmon Electric only during peak periods for up to 4 hours a day and not to exceed 30 days per year.


YOUTHPOWER ENERGY CAMP


CONTEST


Two lucky eighth graders from this area will be Harmon Electric’s guests at this electrifying camp


Students who are interested in developing leadership skills and learning about electricity and electric coopera- tives are encouraged to consider entering the YouthPower Energy Camp contest. Two contest winners from the Harmon Electric service area will be selected to attend the 2013 Youthpower Energy Camp, May 28 - May 31, 2013 at Canyon Camp in Red Rock Canyon, near Hinton. At Energy Camp students learn fi rst-hand the exciting world of rural electric cooperatives through demonstrations by rural electric crews. The group will also tour an electric generating plant. Plus, they will set up and operate their own cooperative business.


Among the activities the group will enjoy in the area are volleyball, swimming, nature hikes and cookouts. Selection of the two students will be based on the follow- ing guidelines:


WFEC will notify Harmon Electric by noon on days a peak is predicted. Harmon Electric in turn notifi es the irrigation member by phone or text that peak has been called and irrigation will be off from the hours of 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. If WFEC sees that there is no chance of peak being set that particular day, they will instantly notify Harmon Electric, who will in turn notify you and restore power to your irrigation account immediately. Another source to fi nd peak notifi cations is the Harmon Electric facebook page. Be sure to fi nd our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Harmon-Electric- Association-Inc/154725664575443 and “Like” us to receive these peak notifi cations.


Contact us today at 580-688-3342 or 800-643-7769 to get your irrigation accounts changed to the better controllable irrigation rate.


Students must currently be classifi ed as eighth graders at- tending a school in Harmon Electric’s service area. Students must complete an entry form and prepare an essay of 250 words or less on the topic: “A day without electricity”.


Students should ask their English teacher for contest rules and entry forms which will be delivered to area schools in late January or contact Beth Penington at Harmon Electric by email at bpenington@harmonelectric.com or call Beth at (580)688-3342. “Like” Harmon Electric on facebook and watch for deadlines and announcements.


Sleek new at-panel TVs can consume almost as much electricity as a refrigerator. In general, the bigger the screen, the more power it draws, and HD pulls more, too. Plasma screens use the most energy, while LCD TVs use much less. And remember to change your new TV’s default settings to a power saver mode, and turn down the LCD backlight to s


save energy without sacriicing picture quality.


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