This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
January 2013


Volume 60


Number 1


Blue Summit Wind Farm north of Vernon, Texas Wind Is An Important Energy Source


Wind. There is a lot of it in southwest Okla-


homa and north Texas. What’s more, we all know that wind


is an increasingly important part of the nation’s energy resources. Over the past decade, wind farms have sprung up throughout the nation to add clean, renewable power to the national en- ergy grid.


Blue Summit During the past year, the Blue Sum-


mit Wind Farm has been built in north- ern Wilbarger County, Texas, right in the middle of SWRE’s 6,000-square- mile service territory. Blue Summit, located north of Vernon


and stretching westward toward Chilli- cothe, includes 85 giant wind turbines spread across 11,500 acres. The massive collection of windmills


has become a significant landmark on the horizon from many points in our part of Oklahoma and Texas. Especial- ly at night, the wind towers’ collective flashes of red light are hard to miss. SWRE Benefit?


Many SWRE members have asked


whether our co-op benefits from the Blue Summit wind farm. Do we receive the power that is generated there? The answer is “No.” Blue Summit sells its power through


ERCOT (the Electric Reliability Council of Texas) into the Texas wholesale mar- ket. Power from the Blue Summit Wind Farm does not go into a power grid that is used by SWRE. Ironically, however, because of its


position in SWRE’s service territory, our co-op does supply electricity to the wind farm’s headquarters. SWRE has a contract to deliver electricity for op- eration of the wind farm’s main office and switching station. Western Farmers Power


SWRE’s power provider is Western


Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC). Although the power that is delivered


to SWRE’s member homes and busi- nesses does not come from the Blue Summit Wind Farm, a very significant amount of our power is generated by wind. WFEC has purchase agreements that provide power from four Oklahoma


wind farms – Blue Canyon, located in the Slick Hills north of Lawton; Buffalo Bear, situated north of Woodward; Red Hills, located near Elk City; and Rocky Ridge which opened this year north of Hobart. On an average basis, wind-gener-


ated energy accounts for 12 percent of WFEC’s power that is delivered to SWRE’s members. In the utility industry, 12 percent is a


very significant level – one that most utilities aspire to. It is a level, though, that is sure to continue to increase in the future.


WFEC Power Mix What power sources are in WFEC’s


energy mix? As of mid-December, WFEC’s 2012


year-to-date power generation sources were as follows: Natural Gas - 52 percent Coal - 30 percent Hydro - 6 percent Wind - 12 percent NOTE: Hydro and Wind, both clean,


renewable energy sources, combine to make an impressive 18 percent of WFEC’s (and SWRE’s) power mix!


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