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The ElectraLite


JANUARY 2013 Longtime Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative Employee Retires


After 27 years, Sharon Dunn has decided to retire from her position as a customer service representative at Canadian Val- ley Electric Cooperative. Sharon started out in dispatch and worked three different jobs at Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative, her last being in customer service. “I enjoyed helping the custom- ers, if I didn’t’ know the answer I would ask someone who did,” Sharon said. “I treated others the way I wanted to be treated.” Canadian Valley Electric Coop- erative is a great place to work, and one of Sharon’s favorite parts was volunteering at the Special Olympics in Stillwater, Okla., every year with her co- workers. “It’s really a great thing to help with the Special Olym- pics every year,” Sharon said. “I even plan on going back with another girl from the co-op this spring after I’ve retired.” Twenty-seven years is a lifetime of memories and hard work. It is also a lot of ice storms, bad weather and long hours trying to get power back to the people of Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative. 902390303 There were times when Sharon, along with other employees of


Canadian Valley would have to go in to work to help when the weather was still bad enough to disrupt power. One year, a husband of a coworker took five employ- ees, including Sharon, to and from work from a designated meeting spot because he had a four wheel drive pickup truck that could get them all to work safely. “We worked all day,” Sharon said. “We went in early and stayed late.” Now, in the days of retire- ment she will be enjoying not having to go out in the bad


weather, but stay inside. Sharon’s retirement plans include spending more time with her family, grandkids included. “ I want to spend more time with my grandkids, they’re all in ball or things like that,” Sharon said. “I want to be able to pick them up after school if I need to. I also want to spend time with my parents.” During her time with Canadian Valley Electric Coop- erative, customer service and helping others were what Sharon enjoyed the most. Now, Sharon, like so many others, will get to enjoy her days with her grandchildren.


In order to help members understand their monhtly statements, CVEC publishes its rate schedule. These schedules are on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Consumers are divided into classes based on the size and consumption of the service. The following is a summary of each class and the rate charged.


CVEC RATE SCHEDULE


Rate A (2) B (4) E (10) F (12) I (18)


Class


Res. 1-phase Res. 3-phase


Small Comm. 1-phase Small Comm. 3-phase Irrigation


Minimum customer charge $16.50/mo $22.50/mo $25.00/mo $35.00/mo


$22.00/hp annually


Large Power Rates available upon request. - Security Mercury Vapor Light (MVL) equals $6.40 (PCA on 70 KWH).


- Lights High Pressure Sodium (HPS) light equals $6.40 (PCA on 40 KWH). +2% Gross Receipts Tax added to monthly bill Power Cost Adjustment base equals 51.50 mills.


KWH Charge (+PCA)


Summer Season May-Nov. All KWH .0750 All KWH .0750 All KWH .0800 All KWH .0800 All KWH .0868


Winter Season Dec.-Apr. 1st 1,000 at .0750, then at .0520 1st 1,000 at .0750, then at .0520 1st 1,000 at .0800, then at .0700 1st 1,000 at .0800, then at .0700 All KWH .0868


The hidden account number hidden in The


ElectraLite is worth $25. The account number must be your own and found within the contents of the paper. Your number must be reported by the 15th of each month to our office by phone, mail or in person. This month, there are two hidden account numbers.


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