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your CO-OP PAGE 2  JANUARY 2013 your CO-OP


Inside Your Co-op is published monthly for members of Choctaw Electric Cooperative.


Board of Trustees PRESIDENT


MIKE BAILEY • BROKEN BOW VICE PRESIDENT


BOB HODGE • BETHEL SECRETARY TREASURER


RODNEY LOVITT • NASHOBA BILL MCCAIN • IDABEL


BUDDY ANDERSON • VALLIANT HENRY BAZE • RATTAN


JOE BRISCO • FT. TOWSON BOB HOLLEY • ANTLERS


LARRY JOHNSON • FROGVILLE


Management and Staff CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Terry Matlock


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Susan G.Wall


DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS Jia Johnson


BENEFITS SPECIALIST Tonia Allred


DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & ACCOUNTING Jimmie K. Ainsworth


DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS Jim Malone


DISTRICT SUPERVISOR Darrell Ward


toll free telephone 800-780-6486


website www.choctawelectric.coop


TO REPORT A POWER OUTAGE PLEASE CALL


800-780-6486 24 hours a day • seven days a week


BY TERRY MATLOCK Chief Executive Officer


David vs. Goliath Co-ops can accomplish the seemingly impossible M


any of you will remember the bible story about David and Goliath. The story says that Goliath was a big man; he wore full armor, and carried


a bronze javelin and a large spear that looked like a weaver’s rod. Goliath was a soldier.


On the other hand, David was just a simple man living the simple life of caring for the flock. Every day he looked after the flock until one morning he turned the flock over to an unnamed shepherd.


The other day I read this story again, and I could hardly get through it for making comparison to our local co-op, Choctaw Electric, and our co-op employees. Often we are compared with the larger, “for profit” companies; David versus Goliath.


Electric co-ops like Choctaw Electric are mostly small, local and directly connected to their communities. But we go to battle, so to speak, with national investor-owned utilities every day.


Today we bring electricity to isolated areas and small towns that profit-driven companies


declined to serve—and we do this with less. Nationwide, electric cooperatives collect revenue from an average of 7.4 members per mile of line. Investor-owned utilities (IOUs), on the other hand, collect money from an average of 34 consumers per mile. Despite this very significant difference in revenue, co-ops still manage to provide great service at very affordable and competitive rates.


We do this by sticking to our values, and employing outstanding people. Our lineman and serviceman come to work every day and do their jobs tending to the business of CEC. We have a lot of David’s here at Choctaw Electric, employees who continue to do good work without a lot of notoriety. Not afraid of the task they are given, and grateful for the opportunity to perform as the professionals they are.


The next time you see one of your employees from Choctaw Electric, I hope you will tell them thanks for a job well done.


I hope you have a great year. FEDERAL UTILITY ASSISTANCE


CEC CEC


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