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Best Bull Rider: Cord McCoy By Gail Banzet


As a young boy in Tupelo, Cord McCoy and his four siblings were familiar faces around the rodeo arena. The professional bull riding star remembers jumping on his fi rst calf at a peewee rodeo at the age of fi ve. As a young teenager, McCoy competed in the High School Rodeo Association and earned a rodeo scholarship to college. “I was a member of just about every rodeo as- sociation and competed on the rodeo team at Southwestern Oklahoma State University,” he says.


After earning a college degree, McCoy joined the rodeo circuit full time, riding bulls in the International Professional Rodeo Association and competing in the Professional Bull Riding (PBR) Finals, the PBR World Finals and the National Rodeo Finals in Las Vegas. As a top-10 fi nisher at the PBR World Finals, McCoy is a competitive athlete who recently kicked off the 2013 PBR season.


“The thrill and the challenge keep me coming back but the money is also a lot better than it used


to be,” he says. “If you ride well, you can win enough to pay for a ranch and plan retirement— unlike the generation of bull riders before me.” When McCoy is not on the road riding bulls, he’s at home on his Tupelo ranch where he and his wife raise cattle, bucking bulls and horses. But just a few short months ago, McCoy and his broth- er, Jet, found themselves thousands of miles across the world taping the CBS reality television series The Amazing Race. “Jet called me up one day with a ‘great idea,’ so we taped an application video and fl ew out to California for an interview,” McCoy says. The bull-riding brothers were invited to com- pete in the show’s Season 16 in 2010. After fi nish- ing second in their first appearance, the duo returned in their cowboy boots for Season 18. McCoy says the show was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.


“It was pretty wild, and even though Jet and I didn’t win a dime, I bet we had more fun than any other team,” he says.


Best Livestock Auction: Northwest Stockyards By Gail Banzet


Formerly known as the Winter Livestock Facility of Enid, Northwest Stockyards, LLC, was purchased in May 2011 by a group of investors and members of the Mason and Munkres families. The sale barn holds a commercial cattle sale every Tuesday, averaging around 1,100 head of cows, bulls and feeder calves. Together the two families are continuing the legacy of their late grandfather, Pat Mason, who owned and operated several sale barns in the northwest-Oklahoma area for more than 30 years. Brothers Lance and Trever Mason work alongside their father, Kirk, to manage the daily operations of the business. Cousin Otis Munkres serves as vice president, overseeing all real estate and maintenance interests, and several other family mem- bers work in the sale barn offi ce.


“Each family member brings something to the table, so we’re kind of a melting pot of different personalities that help the barn function,” says Trever who spent


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much of his time on the road in his previous engineer- ing job. “I seldom saw my family, so the stockyards is an opportunity for us to be together. We are working toward the same goal while taking a sense of ownership and pride in what we do.”


Despite purchasing the facility in the middle of a drought, Trever says his family’s feed yard business in Ringwood complements the sale barn and has helped maintain weekly numbers.


“Weather has not been on our side at all, but we want to be one of the largest feeder cattle sale barns in the United States,” he says. “We want to be competi- tive and successful and provide a quality service for our clients.”


With more than 75 years of combined experience in the livestock marketing and feed industries, the Mason and Munkres families enjoy contributing to Oklahoma’s agricultural industry.


Photo Courtesy of Andy Watson


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