This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Oklahoma Outside


HARDEST WORKING, SMOOTHEST RIDING


FEATURES


NEW! 60 HP ProStar™ 900 engine with class-leading torque


NEW! Longer chassis with more suspension for a smooth ride


NEW!


2013 RANGER XP® 900 Shown with optional accessories


NEW! Revolutionary Lock & Ride® PRO-FIT™ cab system


Utility Trees O


800-750-5357 or 918-336-3800 • www.BartlesvilleCycleSports.com BARTLESVILLE, OK


Warning: The Polaris RANGER and RZR are not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to grasp the hand holds and plant feet fi rmly on the fl oor. All SxS drivers should take a safety training course. Contact ROHVA at www.rohva.org or (949) 255-2560 for additional information. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, protective clothing, and seat belts. Always use cab nets. Be particularly careful on diffi cult terrain. Never drive on public roads or paved surfaces. Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. Check local laws before riding on trails. ©2012 Polaris Industries Inc.


Choosing the best trees and shrubs for power line easements and small backyards


By Allan Storjohann


ver the past several years Oklahoma has been the target of a high number of destructive winter and spring storms. Tree damage has been catastrophic, as has been the devastation to power lines. In order to prevent future widespread power outages, your electric cooperatives are regularly working to prune back or remove trees that pose a risk to the lines. (You only have to live without power a few days in the dead of winter to appreciate the need for power-line pruning.) That being said, when it is determined that a tree must come out, or be pruned severely, it is still a hard pill to swallow.


Are you one of the thousands of homeowners who have heard this statement? “Sorry, but those trees will have to go.” If you are included in this sad lot, I’m sure the next emo- tion you had was disbelief that the action is necessary. Why take them out? Aren’t the trees performing a good purpose? The loss of mature trees can be felt deeply by many homeown- ers, and they probably now wonder what they could have done differently years ago to keep their trees out of harm’s way.


Mid America Shelters www.midamericashelters.com


918-227-1919 • Fax 918-227-0623 FEMA approved 48” diameter above ground storm


shelter anchor bolted to the garage floor. Holds 5 to 6 adults. Built for strength, Built for price, Built to save your life.


$1500 + tax and installation


Containers For Sale New & Used, 20’, 40’ & 40’HC


• Locally Family Owned • Many to Choose From • Free Local Delivery from 3 Oklahoma Locations


12 I WANNA RIDE ADMATS Rancher





It takes a while for trees to reach a height that might impact power lines. When planted they are small and don’t appear to be any kind of threat. Depending upon the growth rate of the tree, it could be as few as fi ve years or as many as 10 before they get big enough to cause problems. I’ve surveyed the power lines in my area and they appear to be around 25 feet off the ground at the pole, and 4-5 feet lower where the wire droops, averaging 20 feet to the lowest wire. Below the power lines you will usually fi nd cable television lines; these appear to be only 15 feet off the ground in most places.


It seems pretty obvious that trees should not be planted if they will ultimately grow into


a power line, but unfortunately many either don’t have information about the ultimate height and spread of their tree or they chose to plant it anyway, leaving it up to the power company–in this case your electric cooperative–to handle the situation. Keep in mind that the closer you get to the easement, the smaller the trees need to be. But don’t be discouraged—there are quite a few excellent ornamental trees and shrubs that will be attractive and short enough to not cause problems with the power lines. Regardless what type of plant you select, remember that your electric cooperative has a right to access the easement along the power line and anything you put there might someday be at risk of damage by repair crew equipment.


I suggest homeowners do some research before the landscaping begins. Your local electric cooperative may have literature on recommended space allowance for trees. I commonly fi nd the suggested distance for planting is 15 to 20 feet away from the power line, but I would advise homeowners to place large shade trees—anything expected to grow to 30 feet or more—at least 25 feet away from a line. Trees that normally grow to less than 20 feet can be used closer, but I would never plant a tree directly under a power line. Offsetting small trees, 15 feet or more away, will probably save them from any threat should your electric cooperative need access to the power line in the future. In addition, the area along your back fence near or under a power line need not be a dead zone with little or no vegetation.


Several nursery companies market trees specifi cally for utility plantings. The J. Frank Schmidt and Son nursery has trademarked the term Utilitrees, and they grow an excellent list of short trees for use in areas where there are vertical limitations. Since the nursery is based in Oregon, some of the varieties they promote will not be happy here in Oklahoma. If you check out their list, ask your local nursery about the trees they recommend before ordering.


When it comes to other plants that could be used near the power line easement, the same rule applies for large shrubs that exceed 15 feet. These should also be kept back from the power line by at least 15 feet.


Free Delivery 100 Mile Radius


10 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP Seminole, OK www.minitrucksbs.com


There are many small trees, shrubs and perennials that you can use to create a beautiful view or screen. It will pay off to do a little homework before planting to be sure it will not grow up and become a major problem or an eyesore after it has been whacked back from the power lines above.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140