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C A N A D I A N JANUARY 2013


V A L


ELECTRALITE A LIFE SHORTENED


SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative family mourns the loss of dear friend


S


he was a strong and resolute woman. Her determina- tion, courage and willpower made her an inspiration to many. Ann Kelley Weaver, editor of the Electra-Lite newsletter, fought breast cancer for three and a half years. She said goodbye to her family, friends and loved ones on November 28, 2012. Ann was the Electra-Lite news- letter editor for nearly 10 years. An award-winning journalist, Ann was the wife of Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative’s Marketing & Economic Development Manager Bob Weaver.


“She always worked to make a good story out of whatever idea I came up with. She took great pride in doing the newsletter and enjoyed meeting every single person she came in contact with,” Bob said. Born on January 16, 1971, Ann was a graduate of Fresno State University and East Central University. During her career as a journalist, Ann received numerous awards and special recognition for her work. She was a reporter at the Daily Oklaho- man; where she was respected and admired. “We are saddened by the loss of our colleague and friend Ann,” Kelly Dryer Fry, editor and vice president of news for OPUBCO Communica- tions Group, said. “She was a dedi- cated reporter and true professional. Ann had a way of coaxing people to open up to her. Her writing talents made our readers feel as if they were present for the interview.” Weaver received numerous awards


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E Y


By George After having done so for more than 10


Jan. 16, 1971 - Nov. 28, 2012 Ann Kelley Weaver


for breaking news, investigative and government reporting. In 1999, she was an Associated Press sweepstakes winner for her stories about two wrongfully convicted men. Her work is featured in John Grisham’s best- selling book, The Innocent Man, and used as a source in Actual Innocence, co-authored by attorney Berry Sheck, found of the Innocence Project. Ann also worked in earlier years for the Shawnee News-Star, the Ada Evening News, and at a local paper in her hometown of Dos Palos, Calif. Her job at the Oklahoman was her dream job, said Bob who recalls go- ing to bed so many nights and leav- ing Ann awake, working late on her assignments.


“She was so genuine and easy-to- talk to that most everyone felt com- fortable with her professionalism and dedication in getting the story right,” Bob said.


Prior to launching her career as a journalist, Ann was in the National Guard and a social worker.


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years, Ann Weaver will no longer be the editor of the Electra-Lite. Ann died last month after battling cancer for several years. I would not say that Ann lost her battle with cancer. She never gave in and was still battling when her life here ended. Her last visit with her doctor, when she was too weak to leave her bed, was to discuss future treatment options. While in the hospital, just days before her death, Ann asked that her laptop computer be brought to her so she could work on the next issue of the Electra- Lite. Ann’s life was shortened but she never stopped battling and was never defeated. We have suffered a loss. Ann was a professional journalist. This fact is well documented by her long list of awards and achievements which were accomplished in what most of us would consider only “half” of a lifetime. Ann served as a reporter for three of the state’s largest and best newspapers. We believe that even with the limited re- sources that we provided her, Ann made of Electra-Lite a publication that we were proud to share with our members and to represent us.


Ann was not an employee of Cana-


dian Valley. She prepared the monthly Electra-Lite as a contractor. However, her commitment and dedication to pre- pare a newsletter we were proud of was noticeable by all. She did so in a timely and professional manner. Ann just would not “settle” for anything less. I always told her that I did not trust myself when writing something for the paper, but I always trusted her to not let me embar- rass myself too badly. She did her best to accomplish that task also. Ann had long since become an inte- gral part of the Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative family. We will always remember and miss her greatly. Thank you, Ann, for all you meant to us.


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