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LIVEWIRE | PAGE 3 WIN $50! Q The fine print:


Entry must be received by March 31. Any response is acceptable. Any response may be published. Entrants must be members of Tri-County Electric Cooperative. Entries must include member’s full name and valid contact information, such as a phone number or email. Winner will be drawn and notified in April but will be announced in the May newsletter. The $50 credit will apply toward winner’s May bill. Credit is nontransferable. It will only be applied to winner’s account.


One entry per member per quarter.


Tri-County Electric employees, trustees and their immediate family members are not eligible to win. n


AREA SERVICEMEN PRESENTED THE CO-OP CARES FOOD DRIVE FUNDS TO THE COUNTY FOOD BANKS THE COOPERATIVE SERVES. IN THE PHOTO ABOVE, TRI-COUNTY ELECTRIC SERVICEMAN RAY DAMRON PRESENTS A CHECK TO VOLUNTEERS AT THE CIMARRON COUNTY FOOD PANTRY. FROM LEFT: DAMRON, VIVIAN HUGHES, JOYCE MOSES, PAM WILEY AND EDDIE SNAPP.


uarterly uestion


What low cost method do you use to save energy?


Answer the above question to be entered into a drawing for a $50 credit on your electric bill.


You can submit your entry one of the below ways. Be sure to include your full name and phone number with your entry.


Online: www.tcec.coop Email: info@tcec.coop Mail: Tri-County Electric P.O. Box 880, Hooker, OK 73945


Co-op Cares Food Drive helps feed the hungry


and their hearts to donate to the annual Co-op Cares Holiday Food Drive. The cooperative matched the funds employees raised, doubling the donation amount.


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In December 2012, the cooperative’s employees presented a check for $260 to each of the four county food banks the cooperative serves. Food banks in the Oklahoma Counties of Beaver, Cimarron and Texas as well as Morton County, Kansas received checks. In total, $1040 was given to feed the hungry in the cooperative’s service territory. That’s enough to provide about 5,200 meals considering every one dollar donated provides five meals according to the Regional Food Pantry of Oklahoma.


“Concern for Community is one of our seven cooperative principles,” said Tri-County Electric CEO Jack Perkins. “As a cooperative, we make charitable donations regularly to area causes because we believe 100 percent in that principle and in improving the quality of life for our members. The gift is even more special when our employees are personally involved like with the holiday food drive.”


Employees who contributed $10 or more to the Co-op Cares Food Drive received a chance for a day off with pay. Metering and SCADA Manager David Tivis was the lucky winner of the drawing.


“I’m proud to be part of such a caring group of employees,” Tivis said. “I know the money we gave went to help families in need during the holidays. While I walked away with the gift of a day off, the real gift was in giving to such a great cause.”


To learn more about Tri-County Electric’s charitable giving, visit the cooperative’s website at www.tcec.coop. n


unger is a struggle for one in four children in Oklahoma, according to the Regional Food Pantry of Oklahoma. It is because of those families in need that employees at Tri-County Electric Cooperative dug deep into their pockets


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