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Kilowatt F JANAURY 2013 INSIDE YOUR CO-OP


A Touchstone Energy Cooperative


Kiwash Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Providing the service


that lights up your life.


Office Location PO Box 100


120 W. 1st Street


Cordell, Oklahoma (888) 832-3362


www.kiwash.coop


Find us on Facebook Staff


Dennis Krueger manager


Wendy Putman director of finance


Lisa Willard director of


communications Roy Dewees


director of operations


Board of Trustees officers


Jack Sawatzky president


Robert Travis vice president


Virginia Walker sec.-treasurer


John Schaufele


asst. sec.-treasurer directors


Ralph Cunningham Leslie Hinds Rex Eagan


Great reasons to go geothermal Rising rates, improved rebates make geothermal a smart choice


ll indications out of Washington D.C. are that environmental issues on existing power plants will continue to be assessed, which will increase the cost of electricity. The cost of new construction for the next generation of power plants will also increase the cost of electricity. By 2017 we predict that electricity will cost 15 to 20 percent more than it does today. Kiwash expects a future rate increase will be considered by 2014 and again in 2017. It is time for consumers to begin the self assessment process by considering and implementing energy saving ideas.


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In the past two issues of your co-op newsletter, I used my column to extol the positive benefits of geothermal or ground source heat pumps (GHP). A few highlights of these articles are listed below:


• Geothermal systems save up to 70 percent on heating bills and 40 percent on cooling bills


• A typical GHP system has a life expectancy of 25 years for the components inside the building, and more than 50 years for the pipes in the ground


• The cost of a typical GHP system in the US varies depending on design factors, but offers a payback period of between 3 to 10 years


• While wind and solar generators at your house may be tempting, the real win-win-win situation for your electric co-op, your electricity generator (Western


Farmers Electric Cooperative) — and you— is geothermal


In my opinion, the most environmentally sound move you can make is to install geothermal heating and air conditioning units in your home and business.


Weighing the costs


Nowadays, the cost to install geothermal system inside the home is similar to conventional air source heat and air equipment. This is good news. The drawback is the cost of the geothermal well system.


A four-ton geothermal system usually requires 950 feet of wells to operate under typical conditions. This is accomplished by placing a series of 300 foot wells in the ground with proper piping and a special grout mixture that holds the piping in place and allows interaction with the soil surrounding the pipe. Cooperatives are negotiating geothermal well installations pricing at $7 per foot. The total cost of the well field is estimated at $6,650 for a four-ton unit.


Rebates make it affordable


Kiwash Electric's revised geothermal rebate program for qualifying home or businesses states:


All electric geothermal (also known as ground source) heat pump units with a minimum 18.5 EER & 3.6 COP will be eligible to receive a $1,000 per ton rebate. Units using a gas back-up system qualify at the air-source unit rebate rate. The geothermal rebate is available for new construction, conversion


from gas furnace, or an air-source upgrade. It is not available for replacing existing geothermal systems.


The maximum rebate for any heat pump system rebate is $5,000 per home or business. All rebates are payable to the home or business owner based on a Kiwash Electric inspection and/or proper supplier installation. Other types of installations, or installations not meeting the minimum requirements, are not eligible for rebates.


With rebates, consider how the cost of a four-ton GHP unit changes to your favor.


950 ft geothermal wells field @ $ 6,650 30% federal tax credit


- $ 1,995


Kiwash rebate ($1,000/ton) - $ 4,000 Cost to the consumer


$ 655


Remember, the in-house cost of a geothermal unit is now very competitive with air source heating and air units. With Kiwash Electric rebates, the cost of geothermal wells is even more affordable. Maybe it’s time to consider replacing your heating and air conditioning unit with a ground source/geothermal unit.


For more details on Kiwash Electric's heat pump rebates, please visit www. kiwash.coop.


For additional information on heat pumps, please visit these websites:


www.energy.govwww.climatemaster.comwww.geothermalgenius.org/


By Dennis Krueger general manager


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