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ORTHEAST Oklahoma Electric Cooperative is dedicated to providing its members with reliable electric service, and we’re continually seeking innovative ways and taking advantage of new technologies to ensure we’re meeting that goal. Regardless of how hard we work, it’s impossible to eliminate all power outages. Some circumstances are beyond our control. For example: lightning, high winds, ice or snow storms, transmission line failure, a vehicle hitting a utility pole, a squirrel causing a short circuit and electric equipment failure. While we can’t completely eliminate power outages, we can help you cope with them. This section provides some helpful information on what to do if the electricity goes off.


What to do if your power is out


Check your circuit breakers—those within the home and on the meter pole, to see if they have tripped. Fuses must be replaced; breakers need only be reset. If the problem is not in your main panel, call a neighbor to determine if other homes in the area have been affected. If the problem is not within your home, or several homes are involved, notify the cooperative.


What number do I call? Dial 1-800-256-6405 to report directly to our dispatch center 24 hours a day. You will be asked for the account or pole number of the location experiencing the outage. If all lines are busy, your call will be answered in the order it was received. During a major outage, you may also leave a voice message providing us your name, account or pole number, a number where you can be reached and the nature of your call.


Rest assured that our employees will work as quickly as possible to restore electric service to your home or facility.


Where do I turn for updates?


The cooperative offers several ways for members to receive updates during a major outage. Tune in to radio station KGVE 99.3 for news on outage progress and anticipated restoration times. Members who may have Internet access through work, family, friends or smart phones can stay informed by following us on facebook at www.facebook/neokrec or through the cooperative’s


What to do in the event of an outage N


website at www.neelectric.com.


Daily updates are also sent to area newspapers, radio and television stations. When road conditions warrant, updates are also placed in area post offices, city halls, police and fire stations. Members may also call the cooperative to hear a pre-recorded update or to talk with a member service representative. Pre-recorded messages are also available during smaller outages affecting fewer members.


What should I do if I see a downed line?


If you see a downed power line, it is important to stay away from it at all times and contact us immediately. Please do not try to remove anything that might be tangled in power lines. All power lines should be considered energized.


What should I do if I have a


critical care patient living in my home? If you or another family member depends on life support, and the loss of electricity affects these life support systems, you need to have a contingency plan in place. Caregivers of in-home critical care patients should always have an evacuation plan or a plan for how to handle extended outages in the event of a natural disaster or severe storm.


Power restored in stages I


N the event of a widespread power outage, work begins first to restore power to transmission lines and substations. Sometimes service to hundreds of members can be restored immediately by restoring power at the substation.


Next, major distribution feeders are repaired. These are the lines that come from the substation. If energy isn’t flowing over these lines, your home cannot receive power. Tap lines are repaired next. These are the lines carrying power to groups of homes from distribution feeders. Sometimes taps need to be disconnected to get the main lines back on. Finally, individual service lines are repaired. While the cooperative is responsible for getting the electricity to your meter, members must contact an electrician to repair damage to member-owned electric equipment (beyond the meter).


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