This book includes a plain text version that is designed for high accessibility. To use this version please follow this link.
PLENARY National Tourism Strategy Q Bad Pitching Q ‘Incentive Travel: The Participant’s Viewpoint’


(Obama) continued from page 22


President listened to the travel industry’s call that bringing more international visitors represents a minimal investment and high- return proposition. We look forward to working with his administration to create jobs and strengthen the economy.” Robert Gilbert, president and CEO,


Hospitality Sales & Marketing Association International (HSMAI): “HSMAI members from the sales and marketing community have known for years that more international travelers want to come here; hopefully this new strategy will reduce the barriers to entry. Combined with the new efforts of the Corpora- tion for Travel Promotion ... the U.S. should now be on a path to rebuild its international market share for meetings and conventions and corporate and leisure travelers.” Yulita Osuba, CMP, president, Conven-


tion Service Professionals International (CSPI); senior director of sales, marketing, event management, and exhibitor services, Orange County Convention Center: “The last several years have been tough on our industry, and it is refreshing to see the government open itself up to greater international travel. CSPI members work hard to


UNCONVENTIONAL Dump Your Elevator Pitch


ing an “elevator pitch,” according to Thom Singer, author of Some Assembly Required: How to Make, Grow, and Keep Your Business Relationships, and an expert on networking at conferences. “While knowing how to clearly and con- cisely tell others about yourself is important,” Singer said in an inter- view, “so much attention is put on it that many people mistakenly lead with their ‘elevator statement.’” He added: “The first time someone meets


W


you, they really don’t care about your ‘verbal vomit’ about you and your career. They care


24 pcma convene March 2012


HEN IT COMES TO NETWORKING, a common mistake people make is to spend too much time creat-


more about themselves. So don’t waste brain cells memorizing three to five sentences about yourself. Instead, memorize three to five questions that will get the people talking about themselves. Most people will turn around and ask you the same questions, allow- ing you to explain who you are and what makes you spectacular.” And what if someone doesn’t reciprocate and ask about you? “They did you a favor letting you know they aren’t interested,” Singer said. “Networking relation- ships are about building long-term and mutually beneficial relationships, not about pitching yourself or your business.” n — Barbara Palmer


bring business to their respective destinations, and the executive order can only increase opportunities for these sales professionals.” Michael D. Gehrisch, president and


CEO, Destination Marketing Association International (DMAI): “DMAI applauds the administration’s efforts in prioritizing tourism as part of the U.S. economic agenda and recogniz- ing travel as the real economic driver and job creator that it is. Hundreds of our U.S. members have been marketing their ... destinations internationally for years, and are eager to work with a unified U.S. travel and tourism strategy.” n — Christopher Durso


EN ROUTE: President Obama flew to Disney World with Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, who joined him to call for a new U.S. tourism strategy.


RESEARCH


Everyone’s Incentivized


earned an incentive- travel award and


95.5% 90.7%


of people who of people who


did not earn one report being motivated by the program.


SOURCE: “Incentive Travel: The Participant’s Viewpoint,” Site International Foundation (www.siteglobal.com) and Incentive Travel Council (www.incentivemarketing.org)


www.pcma.org





PHOTO BY PETE SOUZA/WHITE HOUSE

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126