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Tucson


Real Service, Real Savings, Real Southwest 


DESERT BACKDROP (left): Surrounded by five mountain ranges, Tucson’s scenic beauty sets the mood for outdoor events; TUCSON TOAST (below): Culinary experiences for groups in Tucson are plentiful, from authentic Southwestern and Mexican eateries to wineries and farmers markets.


meeting planners to Tucson. “Real Collaboration, Real Savings,” inspired by the previous year’s award-winning “Master Account Incentive” campaign, allows planners to save up to $15,000 on their meeting. Planners can earn credits towards their master account by booking peak rooms with a two-night minimum, as well as tri- ple savings by booking multiple events. Combined with the bureau’s “You Fly, We Buy” program, the “Real Collaboration, Real Savings” program is already yielding exceptional results — eight out of 10 meeting planners are electing to convert to Tucson, according to the MTCVB. n


A 98 AT A GLANCE


COMMITMENT TO GENUINE PERSONAL service is the hallmark of a great sales team, and the Metropolitan Tucson Con- vention and Visitors Bureau’s (MTCVB) convention sales managers are passion- ate about crafting authentic, customized meeting experiences. “Outstanding service is the product of our people,” said Graeme Hughes, the


MTCVB’s director of convention sales. “Relationship capital is the key foundation of our brand. This ingrained and sustainable strategy has allowed the MTCVB to retain loyal clients, attract new customers, and remain competitive in a heavily crowded marketplace.” Tucson’s brand promise places an emphasis on delivering memo-


rable meetings. The area’s history — deeply rooted in Native Ameri- can, Spanish, Mexican, and Western influences — is the inspiration for one-of-a-kind meetings set against a backdrop of spectacular and captivating scenery. From airplane hangars and working cattle ranches, to desert gardens and vaudeville theaters, Tucson’s meet- ing options stretch far beyond the ballroom. It’s these elements, said Hughes, that keep meeting planners coming back. “Tucson’s rugged ranches, natural surroundings, elegant historic


hotels, and unique venues create incredible, unforgettable meeting experiences,” said Allison Cooper, the MTCVB’s marketing director. This year, the MTCVB has launched a new campaign to attract


pcma convene March 2012 www.pcma.org


Convention facilities: The Tucson Convention Center offers more than 205,000 square feet of meeting and exhibit space. Hotel rooms: Tucson has more than 16,000 rooms. Attractions: Tucson is home to a range of outdoor, histori- cal, and cultural attractions, including the Pima Air & Space Museum, Mission San Xavier del Bac, historic Anza Trail, Coronado National Forest, Ari- zona-Sonora Desert Museum, Kitt Peak National Observatory, Kartchner Caverns State Park, Sabino Canyon, and a wide range of public golf courses.


For more information: Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau, 100 S. Church Ave., Tucson, AZ 85701; (800) 638-8350 ext. 134; fax: (520) 884-7804; greatmeetings@Visit Tucson.org; www.TucsonOnUs.com


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