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➊ SAN FRANCISCO TRAVEL REPORTS ECO- nomic impact by the direct spending gener- ated by the event. Direct spending is defined into three categories: local spending on lodg- ing, dining, entertainment, retail, local transit — from San Francisco Travel surveys; local spending by meeting sponsors — from DMAI


estimates; local spending by exhibitors on booth and entertainment — also from DMAI estimates. Direct spending is the most conser- vative method and to avoid confusion, we highlight direct spend- ing versus economic impact. Additionally, San Francisco will be pur- chasing the DMAI Event Impact Calculator that measures economic value of an event and calculates its return on investment (ROI) to local taxes.


➋ CURRENTLY, YES, HOTEL ROOM BLOCKS OFFER THE MOST specific measurement in relationship to price/offer for meeting and convention center space. Due to the advent of the Internet and “rooms booked outside the block” (ROB), our industry has to have continued dialogue on the opportunity to look at potential alternative measurements, such as total attendance. At PCMA’s Convening Leaders annual meeting in January, this was one of the most-attended and discussed topics between destination marketing organizations, hotels, and meeting customers. — John Reyes, EVP & Chief Customer Officer, Convention Sales & Services, San Francisco Travel


➊ WEDO AMANUAL REVIEW OF ATTENDEES VS. number of sleeping rooms times the number of days and apply a formula based on mar- ket segment to calculate an economic impact value of each group. We utilize economic- impact numbers as provided by CSL (Conven- tion, Sports and Leisure), which performed


the feasibility study for our conference center and subsequent expansion. Several other DMOs in Utah are also using these same economic-impact numbers. We’re also very sensitive to groups that have influence on other potential business for our community.


➋ IT IS STILL AN IMPORTANT FACTOR, BUT WE ALSO REVIEW THE overall economic impact, taking into account number of attendees and rooms booked. Another way we are able to measure the value of potential business is to estimate tax revenue to be generated for our city, county, and state for each group and whether it is new revenue or displaced revenue. — Barbara S. Riddle, CMP, President & CEO, Davis Area (Utah) Convention and Visitors Bureau





“In practice, we will evaluate every opportunity (room nights and other economic drivers) and assign an estimated economic impact value to each attendee in determining our position on rental, sponsorship, and related costs.”


VIEWS OF THE WEST: (top row, left to right): Palm Springs Desert Resort Communities; Albuquerque Balloon Festival; City of Anchorage; Santa Clara Convention Center; sailing Alcova Reservoir in Casper, Wyo.; Las Cruces Convention Center; Golden Gate Bridge at night; Seattle’s EMP (Experience Music Project) Museum and Space Needle.


www.pcma.org


pcma convene March 2012


97


SEATTLE’S EMP MUSEUM AND SPACE NEEDLE PHOTOGRAPH BY ERIK SHECKLER


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