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NORTH CONF. W-L PCT. PF PA OVERALL PCT. PF PA HOME ROAD NEUT. VS. DIV OREGON


FINAL PAC-12 SEASON STANDINGS 8–1 .889 399 209 10–2 .833 551 276 6–1


STANFORD CALIFORNIA 8–1 .889 394 213 11–1 .917 523 244 6–1


WASHINGTON 5–4 .556 270 290 7–5 .583 378 403 6–1 4–5 .444 223 227 7–5 .583 358 293 4–1


OREGON STATE 3–6 .333 206 268 3–9 .250 262 370 2–4 WASHINGTON ST. 2–7 .222 211 311 4–8 .333 358 381 3–3


7–2 .778 341 232 10–2 .833 429 283 6–1 5–4 .556 197 266 6–6 .500 278 370 5–1 4–5 .444 188 202 7–5 .583 295 236 3–3


4–0 0–1 5–0 0–0 1–4 0–0 2–4 1–0 1–5 0–0 1–5 0–0


ARIZONA STATE 4–5 .444 298 255 6–6 .500 407 316 5–2 2–7 .222 269 341 4–8 .333 369 425 3–3 2–7 .222 162 354 3–10 .231 257 475 1–4


ARIZONA COLORADO *ineligible for postseason.


Neuheisel’s Bruins engineered a 29–28 upset that left the division up for grabs. Though it was hardly apparent at the time, UCLA’s


victory also kept Utah in the race. Head coach Kyle Whittingham’s Utes were barely a blip on the horizon at 2–4 in Conference play, even after victories over Oregon State in week eight and at Arizona in week nine. But when the Utes followed up with two more wins over UCLA and Washington State, they made it a free- for-all in the South heading into the fi nal weekend of the regular season. Lane Kiffi n’s USC Trojans entered


that week in fi rst place behind an of- fense led by quarterback Matt Barkley and young wide receivers Robert Woods and Marqise Lee. The Trojans bounced back from their defeat at Arizona State to win six of seven Conference games, including a 38–35 shocker at Oregon in week 12 when a Ducks’ victory would have clinched the North. USC’s only loss in that stretch was a three-overtime setback at home to then-undefeated Stanford. But with the Trojans ineligible for the title, Ari-


zona State, UCLA, and Utah raced to the wire with no more than one game separating the three teams entering the fi nal weekend of the regular season.


79 Arizona suffered through a disappointing 4–8 season. Defen- Robert Woods


sive coordinator Tim Kish took over as interim head coach mid- way through the year and guided the Wildcats to big victories over UCLA and Arizona State down the stretch. Then former West Virginia and Michigan coach Rich Rodriguez was tabbed to take over on a full-time basis at season’s end. One bright spot for the Wildcats was quarterback Nick Foles, who led the Conference when he averaged 361.2 passing yards per game. Wide receiver Juron Criner became the school’s all-time leader in career touchdown catches. Colorado strug- gled in its fi rst year


in the Pac-12, in part to injuries to running


back Rodney Stewart and wide receiver Paul Richard- son, two of its stars on offense. But after those players returned to action late in the season, fi rst-year coach Jon Embree’s Buffaloes won two of their fi nal three games. The last was a 17–14 upset of Utah in Salt Lake City that ended Colorado’s 23-game road losing streak and thwarted the Utes’ late-season run. It also ensured that UCLA would represent the South in the Pac-12 Championship Game. Today’s game marks a new beginning for the Pac-12 Conference, and the 2011 season provid- ed enough thrills, twist, and turns to get the future off to a roaring start.


4–1 0–0 1–5 0–0 4–2 0–0 1–4 0–0 1–5 0–0 1–6 1–0


5–0 4–1 2–3 2–3 2–3 0–5


SOUTH CONF. W-L PCT. PF PA OVERALL PCT. PF PA HOME ROAD NEUT. VS. DIV USC* UCLA UTAH


4–1 2–3 2–3 3–2 2–3 2–3


John Pyle


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