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CL AS S NO TE S ’89 ’90 ’91


ALUMNI AFFAIRS OFFICE SKIDMORE COLLEGE 815 N. BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


ALUMNI AFFAIRS OFFICE SKIDMORE COLLEGE 815 N. BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS, NY 12866


Robin Meyers (stage name Robin Daléa) has been promoting her comedic Web series The Real Girl’s Guide to Everything Else. Touted as “Sex and The City for brown girls” by NPR’s Tell Me More, the series quickly gained a following. Robin plays Rasha, a Lebanese lesbian feminist journalist who is forced to go undercover as a glit- ter-wearing, shoe-obsessed, cosmo-drink- ing straight girl in order to write a fluffy chick-lit book. Robin won an LA Web Fest award for best actress, and the series won Hollyshorts Film Festival’s Audience Award. It has also earned kudos for its diverse cast, lesbian lead, unique story, and, according to Robin, “deserved jabs at a beloved, iconic, and somewhat exclu- sionary TV show.” To watch and read more, visit therealgirlsguide.com. Also check out the Robin Daléa Fan Page on Facebook. And Robin authors a blog cov- ering “the silly side of human psycholo- gy” at twitchingblobs.com (a name in - spired by Skidmore psych professor Shel - don Solomon, who describes anxious peo- ple as “twitching blobs of psychological protoplasm”). Stephen Doff and wife MaryLynn had a fantastic time last summer with children Abigail, 9, and Simon, 4. They visited family in NYC and Ocean City, MD, where they walked across the longest pedestrian bridge in the world, ate world- famous Fisher’s popcorn, and adopted Ellicott City hermit crabs. Good times were also had in Baltimore at the Na - tional Aquarium and in Annapolis, where Stephen especially enjoyed a boat cruise on the Severn River. He and MaryLynn caught up with Tracey Meltzer Kyle and husband Neil at their favorite tapas place in Bethesda. The Doffs teach world lan- guages at Centennial High School in Elli - cott City.


JUNE 2–5


Alyssa Rutchik Padial (lysspadial@ yahoo.com) and husband Paul moved from NYC to Rockland County but con- tinue working in Manhattan. Alyssa says, “We feel like we have the best of both worlds.” Son Jamie and daughter Helena “seem to be adjusting well to the ’burbs.” Alyssa is a physical therapist at New York Presbyterian Hospital, specializing in or - thopedics and pelvic-floor dysfunction. She looks forward to catching up with old friends in June. The women’s soccer and lacrosse coach at the University of Redlands, Suzette Soboti was promoted to full professor last year. She traveled to Italy last summer with a soccer team and worked in a tour of Tuscany. Her women’s team qualified for the NCAA tournament and made it to the Sweet Sixteen for the first time. Su - zette visited with Katherine Mitchell Earnest ’91 in Santa Fe, NM, in July. It has been a busy few years for Jodie Skillicorn, mother of son Wade, 4, and daughter Skye, 2. She recently opened her own practice, Mindful Psychiatry (mind- fulpsych.com), in Akron, OH. Jennifer Spungin Kehoe is working on postdoctoral research and writing a book titled The 21st-Century Segregated North in Public Schools: Urban Education and the Master/Slave Narrative. She lives in Roch - ester, NY, with children Kelsey, 12, and Conley, 11. A teacher at Joseph C. Wilson Magnet High School’s International Bac - ca laureate World School, Jennifer received a PhD in English from the University of Buffalo in 2000. Jon Rubinstein lives in Brooklyn Heights with his daughter Sally, 2. He is the owner of Joe, a group of Manhattan coffee bars, the newest of which opened in February on the campus of Columbia University. Barbara Reynolds Kaylor and husband Charlie own RE/MAX Communities in Simsbury, CT. The couple has two chil- dren: Mandy, 9, and Sutton, 7. Barbara is thrilled to be reconnecting with many Skidmore friends on Facebook these days. Courtney Pulitzer married a Frenchman and is living in Paris with a 16-month-old baby boy.


Laura Hill Turner (farmerturner@myfair - point.net) and her husband have two sons, ages 12 and 16. Beth Campano married Michael Ocam - po on November 11. Karen Baumgartner was among those enjoying the wedding weekend festivities. The newlyweds hon- eymooned in the Caribbean, touring the Sian Ka’an Preserve and the early Mayan cities of Coba, Chichen Itza, and Tulum. Beth’s company, Great Lakes Art Conser -


SPRING 2011


AT WORK Whiskey rebellion “ I


almost had the coolest eighth-grade science project,” says Chris Weld ’87, “until my mom


found out that building a still constitutes a federal offense.” For years the idea smoldered, remaining a dream deferred. Now, Weld has not only a distillery, but a burgeoning reputation for inspired spirits. Today the would-be wunderkind is cooking


up all manner of delicious libations at Berkshire Moun tain Distillery in Great Barrington, Mass., site of a famously pure freshwater spring and once a grand hotel catering to big-city clients. Weld’s


farm yields a healthy harvest of apples each fall, which are turned into brandy. A neighbor’s farm provides corn for whiskeys, Florida molasses is turned into rum, and pears from the nearby Hud - son Valley are distilled into an eau de vie. The New York Times calls the fruits of Weld’s


labor “a thing of beauty.” Maxim names Berk - shire’s Ragged Mountain Rum as its favorite. And Berk shire pulled off a medal sweep last year at the prestigious San Francisco World Spirits Com pe tition, earning bronze, silver, gold, and double gold. Weld and his wife, Taylor Ingham Weld ’89,


are riding the twin groundswells of the locavore movement and the craft distillery movement. What’s interesting is that Weld is bringing Massa - chusetts back to its roots. “In the 1650s there were 150 rum distilleries in New England, mak- ing it the largest rum producer in the world,” says Weld, “until the Brits spoiled the party with the molasses tax.” Crafty New Englanders then switched to making corn-based whiskey, but that too was slapped with a federal tax in 1791, fo - menting the Whiskey Rebellion and effectively shutting down northeastern distilling. More than 200 years later, the eighth-grade


rebel’s smoldering idea is burning brightly, firing the kettles and once again raising spirits across New England. —Jon Wurtmann ’78


CREATIVE THOUGHT MOLLY SURRIDGE


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