This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MATHIEU ASSELIN


Joaquin Chavez ’03 is a peacemaker. The native of El Salvador was in his twenties when he “endured watch- ing my country devastated by civil war” in a 1980–92 struggle between the government and a guerilla coalition including the Farabundo Martí Na- tional Liberation Front. Chavez represented the FMNL in negoti- ations toward a peace agree- ment ultimately brokered by the United Nations. In 1996 he left the FMNL to help found and serve as president of the Centro de Paz (Peace Center), a multisector effort “to pre-


serve the historical memory of the Salvadoran peace process and to share this experience with people from all over the world.” Also a poet and novel ist, Chavez discovered Skidmore in 1996, during a stay at the Yaddo artists’ colony in Saratoga. He enrolled in UWW in 2001. He says, “Skidmore enabled me to integrate in a very fluid manner my life experience and knowledge of Latin American history, politics, art, and cul- ture with my research on social violence and crime and my work on peace pro - cesses.” He went on to earn a PhD in Latin American history at New York Uni- versity, where he is now a lecturer. He works 12- to 14-hour days, teaching, writing, and, most recently, applying his expertise and influence as a peace facili- tator to Nepal. “I think a lot about the future of children and young people around the world,” Chavez says. “Work- ing toward world peace requires patient study, daily work in our personal interac- tions, self-reflection, and a clear sense of the shared destiny of humanity.”


SPRING 2011 SCOPE 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72