This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CL AS S NO TE S CREATIVE THOUGHT Wearable art “B


y kindergarten I knew I wanted to be an artist,” says Glenda Arentzen ’62. Her


Montessori-schooled dreams took shape at Skidmore in the early 1960s, where in jewelry classes she experimented with metal. That medium of expression developed into a career as an acclaimed studio goldsmith and jewelry artist, whose collection has been represented and shown by the Museum of Arts and Design and other galleries. A Fulbright grant recipient early in her


career, she is also a fellow of the American Craft Council and has been an adjunct pro- fessor at Pratt Institute, the Fashion Insti - tute of Technol - ogy, and Col - um bia Univer - sity. Her talent is consistently called upon for special-order work, including pieces for Gen -


eral Electric, to celebrate its creation of high- quality manufactured diamonds, and for De - Beers, for whom she created an equestrian award with a fine diamond in honor of Queen Elizabeth’s parents. Arentzen is quick to note that her most satis-


fying work is creating personal art for individual clients. She designs for those who put a priority on her wearable art, “people who choose the body ornament they would like to wear, then choose the clothing to go with it.” Her work is intimate and responsive. She speaks with her clients and then creates works in silver, gold, enamel, and gemstones, reacting to the emotions of the individual and the project. She says, “When I get to know the person, it is all that more enriching.” Recalling her start at Skidmore, Arentzen


calls the College “unbelievably unique. As a lib- eral arts school, not a commercial art school, it provided an intense yet well-rounded and bal- anced art education.” —Janit Stahl


concerts and New World Chorale. She and Neil are enjoying their Vermont home. Brenda Giombetti Darcey and husband Dick enjoyed Brenda’s birthday celebra- tion in NYC in February 2010. Family visits have included a trip to Italy and a gathering of the whole clan at their cot- tage in Maine. Brenda and Dick went to NYC to help daughter Adrienne, who was recovering from a heart operation. When Adrienne was again able to lift 20-month- old daughter Lillian, Dick and Brenda headed for home in Brunswick, ME. My Skidmore connections include a few Skype sessions with Jerry Conley Rich - mond in Hawaii. Jerry works with Mon - tes sori teachers; her workshops have taken her to the Philippines and Kenya. As noted in the last issue, Paula Rosen Janis and partner Carole have developed CDs and DVDs to capture some of the best of their Secret Garden TV show for children. I purchased a set to entertain my granddaughter Nora, 4. She loves Paula and Carole so much, she named two toy horses after them! Hope to see lots of you in June. CHARLOTTE SMILEY READ 6330 GOLF COURSE SQUARE ALEXANDRIA, VA 22307-1225 GIG4SMILE@AOL.COM


’62


Elizabeth Kasmer Fancher (elizfrancher@gmail.com) loves being assistant principal at New Bern (NC) High School. “I think they will have to carry me out!” she says. On breaks she visits her children and three grandchildren in Wake Forest, NC, and her son—a mem- ber of the Air Force, with one child—in Hurlburt Field, FL. She also vacations in Sanibel, FL. She often reminisces about our “precious” years at Skidmore and real- izes how much her time there helped shape her and her children’s lives. She would love to hear from old friends from Kimball and Skidmore Halls. Pat Graham Stotler and hubby drove from Naples, FL, to St. Simons Island, GA, to spend Christmas with Pat’s 93-year-old mother, who still lives in her own home but has around-the-clock care. In January Pat celebrated her 70th birthday at Disney World with her children and Ethiopian granddaughter Rukiya, 3. Pat Duckwall Selwood and Sam spent a wonderful week in Colorado with daugh- ter Micki and her family. It was their sec- ond trip out west; they journeyed there last fall to watch grandson Hasan play football. He graduates from high school this year and will attend the Colorado School of Mines in the fall. Grandson


48 SCOPE SPRING 2011


Mark will be a high school freshman. Although no longer working for the board of elections, Pat is involved with church and library, where she is a new board member for the regional library system. In February she and Sam cruised the southern Caribbean to soak up some sun. Joyce Shulster Pustilnik’s daughter Amanda, a professor at Maryland Law School, is engaged.


Carolyn Crowther Cook and Dave are still in Old Lyme, CT, a community they love. She is a trustee at the local library, a docent at the Florence Griswold Museum, and active in their church. Between them the couple has seven children; four are his, two are hers, and one is theirs. They have 13 grandchildren and five great- grands so far.


Molly Elsey Anderson and Pierce have moved to Neavitt, a small community on Maryland’s eastern shore. Molly edits and produces the Neavitt Newsletter. She also volunteers at the Chesapeake Bay Mari - time Museum. The couple takes courses at the museum’s Academy of Lifelong Learning. They recently joined Cruising Sailors of St. Michaels, a fun group that sponsors luncheons with speakers, parties in the winter, and sailing in the spring, summer, and fall. Daughter Ellen is busy at Nike, Karen works for the Navy, and Gretchen works in her husband’s law office. The Andersons have four grand- children. After spending the holidays with their children, they left for London, England, to attend a wedding before heading to the Isle of Wight to visit Molly’s cousins for a few days. Martha Deming’s letter included pic- tures of two of her paintings. Check out marthademing.com to view her water - color and pastel work as well as photos of rescued pets. After suffering from a mysterious virus, Martha has regained her health and can now paint, garden, drive, go to the gym, and attend tai chi classes. She also cares for two horses, four rescued dogs, and two cats. Martha participates in “paint out” events and teaches workshops. Last May she earned signature-level mem- bership in the Transparent Watercolor Society of America. Roberta Brandes Gratz has authored a third book, The Battle For Gotham: New York in the Shadow of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, published by Nation Books in 2010. She continues to lecture around the country on urban development issues. After more than seven years on the New York City Landmarks Preservation Com - mission, Roberta was appointed by NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg to his Sustain -


AT WORK


LOUIS H. FOISY


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72