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MASTER SITE PLAN 466 beds


(NORTHWOODS ADDITION) 114 beds


PHASE 1A


Ticks on the to-do list


REPLACEMENT) 238 beds


PHASE 2 (SCRIBNER


Along with an ongoing docket of facility, infra- structure, and technology improvements around campus (e.g., renovations to virtually every resi- dence hall over the past few years), Skidmore has been tackling the dozen-plus projects high- lighted in its long-term campus plan of 2007.


Dining improvements—Murray-Aikins Dining Hall thoroughly remodeled and expanded in 2006 to offer new menu items and cook-to- order choices


Additional student housing—Northwoods Apart - ments opened in 2006, bringing 380+ juniors and seniors into campus living Athletics fields—Wachenheim Field improved and resurfaced, softball diamond constructed, and field-hockey venue created, 2006–07 New music building—Arthur Zankel Music Cen- ter opened in 2010, with widely acclaimed aca- demic and performance facilities Art facility—Saisselin Art Building renovations in progress, followed by expansion to bring added classroom and office space by 2014 Athletics facilities—boathouse improved in 2008, with fundraising now under way for a new one; studies under way for riding stable expan- sion/renovation and new fieldhouse for tennis Student apartments—three-phase project to replace Scribner Village slated for completion in 2013


PHASE 1B 114 beds


“Arts quad” development—Filene Music Build- ing extensively renovated, for use by art history and special programs by fall 2011 Library and information technology—plans begun in 2011 for renovation of Scribner Library to incorporate IT offices, slated for completion in 2014–16 Admissions—fundraising and studies begun for future relocation of admissions and financial aid offices to main campus Science facilities—future Dana Science Center expansion and upgrades now in planning and study phase


SPRING 2011 SCOPE 23


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