This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
you the land, providing you study the situation for a year.” (Having chaired the board of a Dallas school that had switched campuses, he had particular authority to insist on careful study of the option be- fore committing to it.) Jonsson helped the College enlist campus planner Samuel Zisman and architect O’Neil Ford, both from San Antonio. They worked with the board in its studies, examining the cam- pus moves of Goucher, Colby, Trinity, Harpur, and other colleges. Jonsson helped Skidmore pay $120,000 for the land and secure a grant to develop it. The understanding was that the College would use Woodlawn for some purpose, even it decided not to leave the original campus. By October 1961, Susan Sambrook Berry ’62 recalls, students and faculty knew “something was going on” when the trustees were in town having lengthy meetings. All students were asked to assemble in College Hall, and “rumors spread that President Wil- son was going to tell us about a decision to move to Woodlawn or not.” An enthusiastic prank - ster, Wilson chatted “about all sorts of stuff” while the tension in the hall slowly grew. Ruth Wilson remembered that with a solemn face he told the audience that “the trustees have voted to”—long pause— “move to a new cam- pus,” at which, accord- ing to Berry, “the hall exploded” in joy and excitement. Josephine Young Case, chair of the board of trustees, promptly


“What would you think of


moving to a whole new campus?”


Val Wilson calmly puffed on his pipe, then replied, ”I know just the place.”


drafted an eloquent “Charge to the Archi- tects,” calling for a campus that would foster “a feeling of freedom and wide horizon” without walls or gates, offering “as much way for summer’s winds as it does shelter from winter’s,” and with buildings “so placed and so designed that the campus expresses the unity of knowl- edge.” The administration instituted annual Woodlawn Days, with picnics, games, and work parties to clean up the landscape. Faculty biologist Hank Howard inventoried all the vascular plants on the estate, and the art faculty provided advice about finishes for the new buildings. Ford and Zisman seemed to talk to everyone,


on and off campus, including the fathers at Happy Pappy week- end. Students even suggested a technological innovation: giving each dormitory room its own telephone.


Construction began in April 1963, and (after delays due to THE BAREST BONES OF THE NEW CAMPUS TAKING FORM IN 1965


a 1965 construction workers’ strike) students moved into the first dormitories in Jan- uary 1966, when the dining hall was ready as well. But Val Wilson’s presidency had been tragically cut short by his untimely death in 1964; the College’s new president, Joseph Pala - mountain, would over- see the bulk of the new- campus project. Scrib - ner Library and Filene Music Building were next to be built, then the classroom buildings Bolton and Dana, and then more residence halls. After several years, some faculty offices were still in trailers,


20 SCOPE SPRING 2011


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72