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CL AS S NO TE S Life is good in Florida, reports Betsy


Stern Guttag, who invites us to “Come on down!”


Keppie Sullivan’s middle child, Jeffrey, is engaged to be married in June; Keppie is looking forward to a fun family gather- ing. Husband Dave celebrated his semi- retirement in March. Keppie enjoys work- ing part-time at a local high school and traveling to far-off places. Jeanne Bresciani returned to Skidmore’s dance department as an artist in residence in February. With Prof. Mary DiSanto- Rose, she codirected a program in Isadora Duncan choreography for a May perform- ance at Kaatsbaan International Dance Center in Tivoli, NY.


Among the highlighs of 2010 for me: son Seth getting married, visiting San Antonio, TX, and Carnegie Hall in NYC, and sailing off the coast of Maine. Life is good for one of the “new 50.” MARTHA PANTIER TEHAN 16124 SILVERADO DRIVE EDMOND, OK 73013 MARTHVIC@AOL.COM


’73 ’74


a special hello to all the nurses. When next in the Saratoga area, remem- ber to visit Jean Integlia Travis and her family’s ever-popular establishment, the Jonesville Store near Clifton Park (check it out on Facebook or thejonesvillestore.com). While Jean’s husband, John, manages his restaurant/deli downstairs, Jean is busy upstairs curating her art gallery. And, to enhance the family project further, son Ben (Union ’09) manages the live music venue and exceptional beer selection, while daughter Alex (Geneseo ’13) spends vacations and summers charming the pa - trons. The family works hard and has fun too! Jean is also in constant contact with Molly Bennett Lane; she and Molly hope to rendezvous again this year somewhere between Molly’s horse farm in Keene, NH, and Skidmore’s campus. Portland, OR, residents Cooki Landis Messmer and husband Russ welcome hearing from Skidmore friends at Messmer2 @frontier.com. REGGIE CARBON TIHAN 706 BOUNTY DRIVE, #603 FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 RCTIHAN@COMCAST.NET


JOANNE RUBIN 6743 MONARCH DRIVE SYLVANIA, OH 43560-3177 JRUBIN610@AOL.COM


In Massachusetts Nancy Garran is executive director of her family’s 90-year-old business, Cape Cod Sea Camps, which runs children’s summer recreational camps. Nancy met her hus- band, David, at camp. They raised two boys, Garran and Christian, who both met their wives at camp and have now joined the family business as well. In addition to running the business, Nancy uses her nursing skills at camp every sum- mer. She finds the work very rewarding and feels blessed to live and work with her family on Cape Cod. Suzanne Shailer Logue recently gradu- ated from the University of Phoenix with a master’s degree in psychology. Jean Wadhams Geller works full-time as an ob-gyn nurse practitioner while con- templating retirement. She and her hus- band welcomed their first grandchild last fall. Her husband is transitioning from a clinical to a more academic medical prac- tice. Their three daughters are thriving. The youngest began an accelerated RN/NP program at the University of Rochester, where, as a California girl, she found the New York weather to be a much bigger challenge than the academics! Jean sends


’75 ’76


AT WORK Ocean view


“M


y English degree from Skidmore never limited nor defined what I could accom-


plish,” says Cathy Offinger ’73. As operations manager for the Deep Submergence Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, she’s proven that. After graduation she worked in a restaurant on Cape Cod for the summer, then was hired as a lab assistant at WHOI, on the Massachu setts coast. She’d had only a semester or two of biol - ogy, but the geologist who “took a chance” on


NONI REILLY 114 CUSHING AVENUE BOSTON, MA 02125-2033 617-288-2104 NOREEN.REILLY@VERIZON.NET


Joel Keener is an associate profes-


sor of art and graphic design at Chey ney Uni - versity of Penn sylvania, the nation’s first histori- cally black institution of


her “knew Skidmore girls and figured I’d be smart enough to train,” she says. In 1974 she made her first re search cruise and was hooked. Spending three to four months a year at sea,


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higher education, founded in 1837. In 2008 he codesigned a BS program in graphic design that features a state-of-the- art Mac computer lab. Joel has created a bronze sculpture of the late broadcast journalist and Cheyney alumnus Ed Bradley, best known for his work on CBS’s 60 Minutes. The sculpture was unveiled in February, in the communications depart- ment’s new television studio. Cheryl Montana Fletcher’s son Cory got married last summer in Newton, MA. Cheryl is still teaching art at Proctor High School. She and her husband visit Sara - toga every August and love walking around campus.


After many years directing the Master Builder Association in Bellevue, WA, and marketing Tully’s Coffee, Lesley Shana -


Offinger served as a navigator, controlling an un - derwater vehicle at the end of a cable thousands of feet below. In 1985 she was on the research vessel Knorr, with renowned shipwreck hunter Robert Ballard, when its crew discovered the long-sought RMS Titanic. She says she’d just been relieved from watch at midnight and was barely asleep when she heard shouting: “We found it!” But then, “amidst all the excitement, we real- ized we were floating right above the gravesite for so many who had perished. We held an impromptu memorial service on the ship's fantail.” Other projects have been memorable too, like


discovering the WWII German battleship Bis - marck in the North Atlantic; exploring the Lusi - tania, torpedoed in 1915 off the coast of Ireland; discovering the aircraft carrier Yorktown, sunk during the Battle of Midway; and viewing ancient shipwrecks in the Mediterranean and Black Sea. After nearly 40 years in the field, “it delights


me that I am still involved with operations for deep-sea research,” Offinger says. “My years at Skidmore provided me with a sense of curiosity and desire to enjoy the adventure, allowing me to follow a rather unconventional path.” —MTS


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CREATIVE THOUGHT DUCEPRODUCTIONS.COM


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