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VALEDICTORIANS


Dorothy Holland ’93 is a drama queen. At age 4 she had the courage to sing for an audience of 8,000 at a revival meeting (her daddy was a preacher). By 17, in California, she was performing for pay in Sacramento’s Music Circus—singing, dancing, and acting in a daunting nine musicals in 10 weeks. When she left Hollywood High, she went right to New York City, where she worked with Neil Simon, Matthew Broderick, Burt Reynolds, and Dom DeLuise. Off-stage, there were other incarnations: homemaker and mother, house remodeler (knowledge of stage sets helped), and performing arts teacher. Holland was in her forties when she decided to earn a college degree. “I suspect that ‘out of the box’ might be my de- fault modus operandi,” she remarks. She gives UWW rave reviews: “Hear- ing guest speaker Mary Daly, discussing Kierkegaard with Prof. Joel Smith, and talking feminist theory with Prof. Mary Stange ignited my passion for philosophy that had been quietly bubbling.” After earning her bachelor’s in theater, Holland completed an MFA in directing and a PhD in theater history and thought. As a professor of theater as well as women’s studies at Virginia’s University of Richmond, Holland is blending the roles of artist, scholar, and teacher. On stage, she finds joy in “art that thrills, art that tickles the mind and moves the heart, art that takes my breath away.” In class, her joy comes from “sharing those ‘aha’ moments with students when they suddenly see the world and themselves differently.”


28 SCOPE SPRING 2011


CASTON STUDIO


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