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Staff Training


A world-class investment


Attractions specific training: an investment with a worthy return S


o many attractions claim to deliver a world-class experience, and in so many ways they do: by investing in the most amazing themed rides and


engaging environments. But an attraction fails to realise its full guest experience potential without an equal investment in the team members and in the supervisory and management team that deliver the experience to the guests. In a special feature for Park World, Shaun McKeogh explains why investing in attractions specific training is worth every penny World-class attractions invest in attractions specific training because they understand the impact the team members, supervisory and management team have on the guest experience, and because they want their attraction to realise its full potential in regards to what the guest will experience and how they will experience it. World-class leaders in the attractions management world understand this; as Walt Disney so aptly explained: “You can design and create and build the most wonderful place in the world, but it takes people to make the dream a reality.” The quality of the service experienced by the guests is directly impacted by the engagement of attraction team members and consequently, the care shown by them as they perform their work. This point alone is justification for attractions to invest in training, as it has been proven to be one major contributor to ensuring engaged employees.


An equal investment World-class leaders in the attractions management world spend an equal amount of time planning, developing and delivering attractions specific training because they recognise the impact it makes. What does this training typically look like? It starts with an engaging, well planned Induction program. The induction program sets the tone and expectations for the workplace culture of the attraction. Its main role is to welcome, inform and set the standards for all new team members, no matter what level of the organisation they will work at.


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018


World-class attractions will always have a specific unit of the induction program that focuses on developing brand ambassadors for the attraction. Such a training program will ensure team members receive all the information they will ever need to impart to the guest. Brand ambassador training will include time in the attraction experiencing first-hand the attractions, retail, F&B and other highlights and guest services of the attraction so that the team members can always speak from first-hand experience as they assist the guests. The aim of such an experience is to get the team members excited, informed and proud of where they work. A safety training program specific to an attractions unique needs will always be a key component within the training curriculum. Compulsory training for all team members may include upskilling participants on evacuation processes, fire response, first aid, crisis management and safe lifting techniques. Job-specific safety training, meanwhile, will be offered dependent on each person’s function and crosses the broad spectrum of safety components from working at heights for maintenance technicians working on rollercoasters, to child safety for attraction attendants.


Shaun McKeogh is founder & president of Attractions Academy, providing global training solutions to the attractions industry. www.attractionsacademy.com


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