search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Park Law by Heather M. Eichenbaum, Esq. Employee Satisfaction Interviews


positive or negative, about how they feel their job is going. This allows you to gain valuable insight regarding employee job satisfaction and address legitimate concerns. In addition, it can not only tip you off to an employee who may be considering lodging a complaint, but giving the employee a chance to vent his complaints and feel ‘heard’ could actually discourage him from filing an employment based claim. As important as the mid-season routine interview, however, is a thorough exit interview - whether an employee is going to be fired or if he resigns. In the case of the involuntary termination of an employee, an in-person exit


W


interview should be conducted just before giving the employee notice. An employee voluntarily leaving his job can be interviewed on his last day of employment. Regardless of the circumstances under which the employee is leaving, inquire whether he has any complaints about his employment, his supervisor(s) or co-workers, or the expectations placed upon him in his job. Give the employee every opportunity to complain about whatever he chooses. Affirmatively ask whether he has any complaints. You then have evidence to use in your defense of any later claim by the employee if he didn’t make any complaints in the interview. Employee interviews are best conducted in-person and verbally and, if the


employee will agree, they are recorded. There is no better evidence of what both parties to the interview said, or how they said it, than an audio recording. Make sure the employee confirms on the recording that he consents to the interview being recorded. Alternatively, if you don’t have the staff or time to conduct verbal interviews, have employees periodically, and particularly before termination, complete a ‘survey’ asking the same questions and allowing ample space for comments and complaints. Be certain each paper survey is signed and dated by the employee.


In addition to inquiring about complaints in the exit interview, ask whether the


employee has been involved in any patron incidents or complaints. This is important because you may end up defending lawsuits for incidents in which the soon-to-be-former employee was either directly involved or was a key witness. You deal with countless incidents every season but the employee will likely remember if he was involved in such an event because it wouldn’t be as common for him. Thus, if you ask, he will bring to your attention any incidents for which you should be sure to retain his training and personnel file longer than you otherwise might, and for which he may end up being a critical witness. Finally, whether you audio record or conduct the interviews by written questionnaire, retain them for at least two years after the employee leaves your company. Audio recordings can be easily transferred to an audio file on your computer system for safe-keeping and, if written, the original documents can be scanned and also saved electronically.


Heather M. Eichenbaum is an Executive Committee Member with Spector Gadon & Rosen, PC, practicing in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. She concentrates her practice in the defense of amusement, sports, hospitality, and recreation venues. Legal counsel to, and a Board Member of, NAARSO, she is also a member of the NJAA, IAAPA, OABA, and IISF. For legal assistance regarding proper employee interviews, you can reach her at: +1 215-241-8856, or heichenbaum@lawsgr.com.


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018 7


e all know there is tremendous employee turnover in the amusement industry. Whenever possible, employees should be interviewed at least once per season to get feedback, whether


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138