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www.parkworld-online.com


Something in the air…


Simtec unveils ScreenFlite


Simtec’s unique media information system has been developed with Clear Channel Italy and Samsung for Terminal 3 at the Aeroporto di Roma as ‘Le Chandelier’. The system itself is installed in Terminal 3 at Rome Fiumicino Airport.


The huge digital sculpture with mobile LED screens was placed within the Leonardo da Vinci Airport, and there, almost inaudibly, the twelve LED displays shuffle in an elaborate dance, arranging different patterns. Each display can individually playback media content in synch with the movement. Depending on the media content’s demand, the rotation of the ScreenFlite can be programmed individually to maximise creative input.


P


arc Spirou celebrated its first Halloween season with style, introducing two new seasonal attractions: drop tower the


Gold Mine, and digital program Dracula AGV Dark Ride. All-new Halloween décor and novelties included scary creatures and symbols: ghosts, skeletons, giant spiders, carved pumpkins, cobwebs, crooked tombs and haunted farming equipment. Standing at 90m, the Gold Mine Tower is the


world’s rotary tilt tower, and each of its 24 passengers will enjoy a great view over the park before tilting 20°forward and plummeting towards the ground at speeds of 135kmh. Parc Spirou’s new digital dark ride Dracula AGV Dark Ride sees riders follow the antics of two intrepid adventurers braving the Count’s castle. Eight riders board three individual vehicles for the new attraction, which replaces Zombillenium.


IAAPA attends EU Operator’s Forum


IAAPA attended the EU Operators’ Forum Hospitality sub-group, a gathering of private sector operators and policy makers to address issues related to security of public spaces and terrorism. IAAPA briefly presented the issues its members are facing in the hospitality side of the business and was proactively asked to contribute to the drafting of guidelines that Commission officials are working on. MEPs discussed the draft opinion on the Visa Code proposal, which seeks to facilitate tourist visits in European Member States. Some MEPs voiced concerns over the potential abuse of an overly liberal system with short processing times, noting that migration concerns and security issues must be taken into account. IAAPA attended the 17th European Tourism Forum in Vienna, hosted by the


Austrian Presidency of the Council of the EU. The key themes this year were the issue of over-tourism and the potential of digitisation to improve the travel experience and address challenges posed by tourism to local communities. On the New Deal for Consumers, MEPs discussed both proposals, with concerns


raised by a number of parliamentarians over the potential of the proposal on collective redress to create a US-style class action system open to abuse. Finally, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker delivered his last


State of the European Union speech, where he emphasised the challenges the EU currently faces in migration and the rule of law, while making the case for more work to be done on trade, foreign policy and defence.


22


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018


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