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Park News www.parkworld-online.com


Figures of Fun 20


new recreational parks, 15,000 residents, and 10,000 professionals are set to be welcomed to the in-development residential distract on Yas Island, Abu Dhabi. The plots are up for sale as local developer, Miral, continues to transform the island into a business and tourism destination.


2,000


People have signed a manifesto, drafted by leading Toledo businessmen, in favour of opening a Puy de Fou park in the Spanish city.


will be beneficial for the local economy. 2,300,000


visitors are expected to visit Puy du Fou in 2018, breaking the 2017 record of 2.26m visitors. The increase is due to the extended opening of the park until November 4, 2018, and park officials also claim that the increased international profile of Puy du Fou helped draw 315 of its guests from abroad in recent years.


5,000,000


euros have been instead by Belgium’s Plopsaland De Panne to transform its flume into a dino-themed water ride. The original ride was built in 1989, and follows the park’s recent announcement that it would also be re-theming the Wizzy & Woppy area. Plopsaland is also set to welcome a new hotel, which will be located at the park’s entrance.


25,000,000


million is the number of visitors which Dubai aims to attract by 2025. The ambitious tourism strategy has been put in place to strengthen Dubai’s position as a tourist destination. The country is also seeking to boost growth in major tourist-exporting markets and diversifying sources from markets with high potential.


Promoters of the manifesto consider the project


BigQuestion How’s business been this year?


Scott Simpson, Playland’s Castaway Cove We started with a colder than normal winter, Easter was a couple weeks earlier, and our spring temperatures were in the 40s and windy every weekend. The high humidity continued until September, and once temperatures reach a certain point, visitors want to stay longer in the air conditioning, particularly during the afternoon hours.


Paul Nelson, Waldameer Park & Water World We started slowly in May and June because of the rain. However, July and August were the best months we ever had and our waterpark was our shining star; we’re up over 10%. In fact, because of the good season we’re starting a new 10-year plan which will cost over $60 million.


Richard Smith, Flambards Theme Park We experienced significant snowfall, for Cornwall at least, early in the year that caused damage to the park. Easter was quieter for our outdoor attractions due to the prolonged wet weather. However, numbers picked up significantly over the summer and we remain on track for a reasonably successful year despite the ongoing economic uncertainty.


Darrell Klompmaker, Little Amerricka Business is down. It was a very sketchy weather year.


in association with


Kernels


Morey’s Piers, New Jersey will power 36,300sq f of maintenance buildings solely through 900-plus solar panels - a continued commitment to improving sustainability and conservation.


From 21-23 April 2019, the first edition of the Saudi Entertainment and Amusement Expo (SEA) will become the Kingdom’s first trade event dedicated to the entertainment and amusement industry.


10


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2018


24 3220


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