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SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS The long-standing AIMS International


educational programme in the USA provides an outstanding week-long curriculum of classes and programs on maintenance and safety by industry experts. NAARSO (National association of


amusement ride safety officials) also based in the USA provides another outstanding source of information and training


Industry standards I have mentioned standards a couple of times now and this is often overlooked when reviewing your maintenance and safety checklist and PPM programmes. Ensure your programme meets or indeed


exceeds the standards applicable to your operation and part of the world. We are blessed with several outstanding primary sets of industry standards such as the all new EN 13814 parts 1, 2 & 3, ASTM F24 and ISO. Moving back to the maintenance and safety checklists


programmes, we must also talk about the integration of safety management systems and procedures that walk alongside the checklist programs and embed themselves in each part and section from start to finish. Always consider and integrate your safety management system


components where needed within your programme, for example: lock out / isolation procedures; PPE programmes; working at height protocols; confined space; lone working; hearing protection; high work rescue provisions; calibration; manual handling; fire safety; electrical safety and of course, the OURA – Operational Use Risk Assessment. Of course, rides have evolved over the years and thankfully so


have our programmes and procedures, but it is not just technology that has improved and moved on, but how we dress a ride today. Theming is now the norm on many rides and attractions and must be considered and accommodated within the inspection routines and schedules. Theming can often include special effects that require specialist engineers to inspect and check on a scheduled basis.


The digital transformation We must mention the digital evolution that we see now in our maintenance management and checklist programmes across the park, not just on rides and attractions. I joined this revolution some four years ago now, taking me full circle from my days crawling under the Eyerly aircraft company


38


Monster ride at the Pleasure Beach with my all- knowing senior engineer. A digital checklist takes the file cabinet from


the workshop onto the very buggy used by park maintenance technicians to provide them the information they need at the ride when they need it. Digital systems are becoming more


commonplace now in the amusement and attractions industry. This is not a new phenomenon they have been in use for many years at both larger and smaller parks and attraction facilities in one form or another. In my humble opinion, it is just a matter of time before the entire industry shifts over to digital mobile solutions. A digital system should provide your


maintenance team or whatever team you have in


the park conducting checks with an intelligent and informed mobile solution. It needs to provide not only checklist content on a hand-held device, but all the support materials including manufacturers manuals, bulletins, safety procedures, safe systems of work and an efficient way of creating maintenance tasks and work orders.


Lock out/energy isolation procedures In closing, I would like to mention the very important and indeed relevant topic of ride and attraction Lock out/energy isolation procedures. This is one of the single most important safety procedures when it


comes to providing a safe environment and workplace on or about the rides and attractions for your team members. My role at Mobaro takes me around the world working on


checklist content and safety procedures. I can assure you I never leave home without my lock out device. It’s the first item in my travel bag. Before any work or check and inspection routine commences on a ride or attraction it must be made safe. Lock it out for safety!


From his earliest days as a junior apprentice mechanical engineer at Blackpool Pleasure Beach, to his current role as global director of parks and attractions at the Mobaro Park Group, David


Bromilow has seen a number of changes in his 42 plus years in the industry. With his work as chairman of the IAAPA EMEA safety committee and as a member of the IAAPA global safety committee, he has also served the wider industry safety community. David is also a director of Auris International.


PARK WORLD Handbook & Buyers Guide 2019


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