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MACAU BUSINESS


Tourists spend little money


Instead of seeking to attract more tourists Macau could undertake efforts to encourage those already here spend more. With visitor expenditure low, two Chinese academics recommend improving the situation. Attention to perfumes, please…


By João Paulo Meneses jpmeneses@macaubusiness.com


In 2016, the direct contribution of Travel & Tourism to Macau GDP was MOP97,858 million (US$12.239 million) or 27.3 per cent of total GDP (ranking 4th in the world). The total contribution of Travel & Tourism to Macau GDP was MOP204,813 million (US$25.616 million) or 57.2 per cent of GDP (ranking 7th in the world). Visitor exports generated MOP233,535 million (US$29.208 million) or 87.0 per cent of total exports in 2016 (ranking 2nd in the world). In summary, “compared with other Asian countries,


E 22 MARCH 2019


very MOP1 of visitor expenditure can create MOP7,896-worth of additional gross domestic product (GDP) in Macau, conclude two Chinese researchers who have been studying the official statistics since 2010.


“There is only a slightly significant correlation between GDP in Macau and visitor expenditure,” they say. “This may indicate that more attention should be paid to how to raise the level of visitor expenditure.” This means tourists could and should spend more when


they visit the Macau SAR. “As well as the gaming industry (not included in visitor


expenditure) the tourism industry significantly contributes to the economic development of Macau,” state Wang Jingwen and Liang Mingzhu, from Jinan University.


tourism accounts for a large proportion of the economic development of Macau” – but the results could be much better observes Wang. Wang and Liang, in fact, wrote an essay “to analyse the impact of per capita spending by the major types of expense on per capita spending of visitors. More specifically, our study aims to identify what kinds of per capita spending act on the per capita spending of visitors the most.” They conclude that a better transportation system, female consumption and cultural tourism products are “the key points associated with high pulling function [affecting] visitor expenditure. These findings may provide strategic insights for diversifying Macau tourism development, with the aim of achieving a greater economic impact and competitive advantage under the guiding of positive features of the consumer society.” According to the paper Characteristics of visitor


expenditure in Macau and their impact upon its economic growth, shopping occupies the largest proportion of per capita spending of visitors (“in accord with the characteristics of contemporary mainstream consumption culture from the perspective of the consumer society.”) “However, the pulling function of ‘shopping’ is slightly


lower than ‘transportation’,” they say, adding that this “unique phenomenon can be interpreted [such that] a reasonable transportation system will offer more consumption opportunities to visitors.” Furthermore, ‘accommodation’ and ‘food and beverage’


present a relatively weak pulling effect, “which means that there should be more added value to these industries. The


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