search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
news Denby’s New Handcrafted Campaign


Recent events it seems has turned us into a nation of ‘craft lovers’ with the Open University seeing a 622% spike in registrations for creative subjects during the first 2020 lockdown and with an ever- increasing number of us turning to craft in all forms for relaxation, as well as inspiring new businesses across a number of crafting spheres. Embroidery, macrame, upcycling, pottery, painting are being embraced with pottery in particularly pulled out by Stylist Magazine as a ‘cool hobby’. All of this is something Denby Pottery, based in the heart of the Derbyshire


countryside, has known now for over 200 years. Denby’s current campaign therefore focuses on the hand-crafting of its ceramics; the hands behind the handcrafting as well as the craft behind it. Alongside rich stories about the people who make their unique pottery on the same site where the pottery was founded in 1809 and the fascinating craft techniques of ‘jollying’ and ‘fettling’ clay, is its ‘Makers’ Month’. A month-long feature running throughout June to celebrate and champion a number of inspiring Crafters and Makers, who share Denby’s passion


Blue Poppy Art joins BHETA


for the art of careful process and sustainable methods. Resident Denby hand thrower, Sean Flint, for example will be demonstrating how to throw a unique piece of pottery which consumers will be able to view online and each of the Community of Makers Denby is championing will be sharing their stories and tips on Crafting at home.


What More UK: How We Became a Zero to Landfill Company


Zero to landfill is a tall order, but with careful planning and organisation it’s possible. In just one day the What More manages to repurpose 40 tonnes of ‘single use’ plastic per day. “Businesses exist to solve problems, not to hide them away”, says company director Tony Grimshaw OBE. “Becoming a zero to landfill


company was a necessity for us. We manufacture long lasting, durable plastic housewares. Our products can be reused repeatedly, then they can be recycled. There’s never any reason why they should end up in landfill”, says company director Tony Grimshaw OBE. What More has efficient factory design and investment in brand- new machinery. Modern equipment is more efficient. By investing in the latest technology they’ve managed to reduce waste on several counts. What More products are


designed to be reused repeatedly. They’re made of strong and durable materials which makes them long lasting. A Wham toolbox might last your entire career, and then it can be passed on to the next generation. The biggest contributor to What More’s zero to landfill status is its recycling. It’s led them to create several ranges of products made almost entirely from recycled materials. There’s the award winning Upcycled range made from recycled ‘single use’ plastic, and there’s the Recycled range made from post-industrial scrap.


Peugeot Saveurs SNC Announces Opening of UK Subsidiary


The iconic Peugeot brand is delighted to announce the opening of its new subsidiary in the United Kingdom, Peugeot Saveurs UK, trading from June 2021.


The UK business will become the company’s fourth distribution subsidiary, strengthening its presence outside France alongside existing subsidiaries in North America, Germany and Belgium. Peugeot Saveurs UK will be managed by Chris Gee, an experienced marketeer in the cook and homeware


4 | housewareslive.net


sector. Chris most recently headed the European and USA operation for the Sasa Demarle Group, and has previous managerial experience with Le Creuset, Groupe SEB and Bosch. Peugeot Saveurs began life


in France in the early 1800’s, with the brand imagining, drawing, designing and manufacturing everyday objects, bearing the standards of excellence, ease of use and optimal taste in every product made. Peugeot Saveurs’ original


steel grinding mechanism has long made the brand global market leader in pepper mills, offering customers a lifetime guarantee, and providing mills for top chefs’ tables.


HousewaresLive.net


Blue Poppy Art Ltd is the latest housewares and gift company to join the British Home Enhancement Trade Association (BHETA). Known especially for its Frith animal sculptures, the company is based in Malmesbury, Wiltshire and works with British sculptors to create handmade pieces, all with a special bronze finish. As well as large ranges of hares and cats, Blue Poppy Art also supplies dogs, equine, farmyard and wildlife sculpture as well as human and contemporary subjects. The company has been trading for 25 years through independent home and gift retailers and via its own website. Seema Grantham, BHETA’s sector manager for housewares said, “I’m delighted to see such a distinctive home and gift brand joining BHETA. The Frith name is well known, and its products are high quality and immensely popular quality. I look forward to welcoming the team to BHETA.”


New Managing Director of Burgess & Leigh


Jim Norman has been promoted to managing director of Burgess & Leigh. Jim joined Burgess & Leigh in 2015 as marketing manager and business tea leader from Parker Pens where he worked on re positioning the brand in UK. Jim was soon promoted to commercial director at Burgess & Leigh when he grew Burleigh’s customer base which includes many prestigious customers both retail and HoReCa. Jim’s enthusiasm for sharing Burleigh’s stories of design, provenance and authenticity goes hand in hand with Burleigh’s growing significance and desirability around the globe.


twitter.com/Housewaresnews July/August 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44