search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
A


S TUTTERING FOUND A TION TRIBUTE


REMEMBERING GERRY GOFFIN SONG WRITING, S TUTTERING, & S T ARDOM


The Broadway musical Beautiful: The Carole King Story tells the story of Carole King’s career and songwriting collaboration with husband and lyricist Gerry Goffin. Their story began with her first hit song, “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” written in 1959 when she was just 17, pregnant, and newly married to the 20-year-old Goffin.


In the decade that followed that first hit, Goffin and King continued to work together to create a string of chart-topping hits, including “Take Good Care of My Baby”, “The Loco-Motion”, “Up On The Roof”, and “You Make Me Feel (Like a Natural Woman)” to name a few.


"Gerry was a bit introverted, but his lyrics did the talking for him."


Though their collaboration ended in divorce in 1969, Goffin’s career continued to flourish with other artists and producers. During his illustrious career, Goffin wrote


over 114 Billboard Hot 100 hits, eight chart-toppers, and including 72 UK hits. He received


an Academy Award Nomination for “Theme from Mahogany (Do You Know Where You’re Going To)”. Additionally, he and Carole were both inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.


A less documented part of Goffin’s career was his lifelong struggle with stuttering. The young Goffin was described as “hot-tempered yet retiring, speaking with a slight stammer, and as tone-deaf as Howie Greenfield, the teenage Goffin never found a kindred spirit or collaborator to draw out his creativity.”1


. 26


Top left and top right: Carole King with Gerry Goffin


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39