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AL REQ IRE


L REQUIREMENTS OF A


NTS OF A MODERN


RN SPORT


RTS FLO


LOORS, IT


S IT


been the introduction of glass surfaces that integrate LED technology by positioning line markings under the surface, meaning courts and pitches can be illuminated independently. UK-based company Dynamik makes sprung sports fl oor systems which utilise solid synthetic and timber playing surfaces, as well as point elastic, foam-backed, surfaces.


MAKING NEW TRACK RECORDS Their range also includes Ramfl ex, a dense rubber solution designed for high performance gyms and biometric and plyometric areas where a durable and hygienic surface is key. The products’ vulcanised surface is designed to off er optimum levels of grip while its backing has been engineered using both natural and synthetic rubber to create a low- profi le yet highly shock-and-impact-absorbent fl ooring solution. An additional benefi t is that the non-porous surface means the fl oor is both hygienic and easy to maintain. They also include Mondotrack, a prefabricated synthetic rubber track surface, composed of two diff erently formulated vulcanised layers, a process that guarantees a molecular bond between the two layers to ensure a continuous, durable and seamless track. The non-directional surface embossing provides a greater contact area than other tracks surfaces, enhancing slip- resistance and traction to the point where spikes on athletes’ shoes do not need to penetrate the running surface. This increases the athlete’s performance by cutting the time and energy needed for spike


DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021


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