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realise that this philosophy extends beyond merely just products and materials, adding renewable energy to all stages of the cycle. All the electricity they use at their Holland and Belgium plants, for example, comes from hydropower. Interface’s Net-Works program has been welcomed for its Mission Zero approach to a sustainability goal of 100 per cent recycled nylon, but also set out to provide distressed communities


with an entry into


the global carpet supply chain, establishing 14 collection sites in the Philippines, including the Bantayan Islands and Danajon Bank, which has one of only six double-barrier reefs in the world. Replicated since then in Cameroon and Indonesia, the program now benefi ts around 2,200 local families. Its stated philosophy


is clear: “We believe that change starts with us and is transforming Interface from a plunderer of the earth to an agent of its restoration. Through this process of redesigning ourselves, we hope to be a catalyst for the redesign of global industry.” NetWorks, launched in 2012 in partnership with nylon supplier Aquafi l and the Zoological Society of London, had enabled the company to collect around 224 tons of fi shing nets from local coastal villages and transform them into raw materials for its products by the beginning of 2020. Roughly 60 per cent of the elements used to create these carpets currently come from recycled or bio-sourced materials, according to an article for the French social enterprise, Sparknews.


IN PURSUIT OF CARBON NEUTRALITY Sparknews noted: “Thanks to this and its energy eff orts, Interface has managed to reduce its carbon footprint by 69 per cent over the entire cycle of life of its carpets. And to fully achieve carbon neutrality, the company off sets those emissions that cannot yet be cut off by purchasing credits on reforestation or green energy development projects, verifi ed by Bureau Veritas. Now Interface is working to transform CO2 into a design resource for its products, using new materials able to store carbon. Its ambition? To have, someday, a negative carbon footprint.” The Ellen MacArthur Foundation and McKinsey carried out a joint


study which estimated that the Circular Economy could boost Europe’s resource productivity by three per cent by 2030 and generate net cost savings of €600 billion. The benefi ts in terms of green job creation are also considerable, with the European Environmental Bureau estimating that cutting furniture waste alone, could create up to 157,000 new jobs. From an environmental perspective, reducing the millions of tons of material waste going to landfi ll and being incinerated will also dramatically reduce Europe’s greenhouse gas emissions. Friends of the Earth estimates that recycling more materials in Europe would save an estimated 148 million tons of CO2 equivalent (or as much as taking 47


DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021


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