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DOMOTEX WELLBEING 24


MINDFUL


We spend the majority of our lives indoors, which is why it’s important that contemporary interiors are designed to promote emotional wellbeing. And it starts from the floor up


Photography | Milliken | Dezeen.com Words | World Show Media staff


Now more than ever, our environments are having a greater impact on our temperament and overall sense of wellbeing. Designers are embracing the growing awareness that a post-Covid world will involve creating surroundings that are not only functional, but address the way they make us feel about ourselves. Environmental psychology will be key here. There is a growing body


of research that is making a case for identifying how the design of our environments can impact our overall quality of life. Floor coverings are no exception, given that they create the very foundations of our environments and therefore, it could be argued, set the tone for all that comes afterwards, aesthetically and emotionally. Emotional wellbeing has been defi ned in many ways; not least as


consistent positive emotions, moods and our ability to pursue self- defi ned goals, all of which are directly linked to a better quality of life,


QUO TE


Milliken | Change Agent pallete BACK TO CONTENTS DOMOTEX MAGAZINE 2021


improved happiness and learning performance. Given that we spend as much as 90 per cent of our lives inside, it’s important to explore the emotional benefi ts we can foster with the design of our everyday spaces. These range from the introduction of regional physical elements: those that make us feel at home, that encourage us to pause and visually appreciate the material, according to one argument. Materials can include local wood grains, rugs and carpets of varying pile


heights which refl ects local,


natural patterns, exposed brick textures and natural fi bres refl ecting regional themes. Another involves integrating patterns that intrigue, such as fractals that arouse curiosity, mystery and exploration. All these can help engage us in the present moment, fostering an improved state of emotional wellbeing. It’s all


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